Richtige Fernseher haben Röhren!

Richtige Fernseher haben Röhren!

In Brief: On this site you will find pictures and information about some of the electronic, electrical and electrotechnical technology relics that the Frank Sharp Private museum has accumulated over the years .

Premise: There are lots of vintage electrical and electronic items that have not survived well or even completely disappeared and forgotten.

Or are not being collected nowadays in proportion to their significance or prevalence in their heyday, this is bad and the main part of the death land. The heavy, ugly sarcophagus; models with few endearing qualities, devices that have some over-riding disadvantage to ownership such as heavy weight,toxicity or inflated value when dismantled, tend to be under-represented by all but the most comprehensive collections and museums. They get relegated to the bottom of the wants list, derided as 'more trouble than they are worth', or just forgotten entirely. As a result, I started to notice gaps in the current representation of the history of electronic and electrical technology to the interested member of the public.


Following this idea around a bit, convinced me that a collection of the peculiar alone could not hope to survive on its own merits, but a museum that gave equal display space to the popular and the unpopular, would bring things to the attention of the average person that he has previously passed by or been shielded from. It's a matter of culture. From this, the Obsolete Technology Tellye Web Museum concept developed and all my other things too. It's an open platform for all electrical Electronic TV technology to have its few, but NOT last, moments of fame in a working, hand-on environment. We'll never own Colossus or Faraday's first transformer, but I can show things that you can't see at the Science Museum, and let you play with things that the Smithsonian can't allow people to touch, because my remit is different.

There was a society once that was the polar opposite of our disposable, junk society. A whole nation was built on the idea of placing quality before quantity in all things. The goal was not “more and newer,” but “better and higher" .This attitude was reflected not only in the manufacturing of material goods, but also in the realms of art and architecture, as well as in the social fabric of everyday life. The goal was for each new cohort of children to stand on a higher level than the preceding cohort: they were to be healthier, stronger, more intelligent, and more vibrant in every way.

The society that prioritized human, social and material quality is a Winner. Truly, it is the high point of all Western civilization. Consequently, its defeat meant the defeat of civilization itself.

Today, the West is headed for the abyss. For the ultimate fate of our disposable society is for that society itself to be disposed of. And this will happen sooner, rather than later.

OLD, but ORIGINAL, Well made, Funny, Not remotely controlled............. and not Made in CHINA.

How to use the site:

- If you landed here via any Search Engine, you will get what you searched for and you can search more using the search this blog feature provided by Google. You can visit more posts scrolling the left blog archive of all posts of the month/year,
or you can click on the main photo-page to start from the main page. Doing so it starts from the most recent post to the older post simple clicking on the Older Post button on the bottom of each page after reading , post after post.

You can even visit all posts, time to time, when reaching the bottom end of each page and click on the Older Post button.

- If you arrived here at the main page via bookmark you can visit all the site scrolling the left blog archive of all posts of the month/year pointing were you want , or more simple You can even visit all blog posts, from newer to older, clicking at the end of each bottom page on the Older Post button.
So you can see all the blog/site content surfing all pages in it.

- The search this blog feature provided by Google is a real search engine. If you're pointing particular things it will search IT for you; or you can place a brand name in the search query at your choice and visit all results page by page. It's useful since the content of the site is very large.

Note that if you don't find what you searched for, try it after a period of time; the site is a never ending job !

Every CRT Television saved let revive knowledge, thoughts, moments of the past life which will never return again.........

Many contemporary "televisions" (more correctly named as displays) would not have this level of staying power, many would ware out or require major services within just five years or less and of course, there is that perennial bug bear of planned obsolescence where components are deliberately designed to fail and, or manufactured with limited edition specificities..... and without considering........picture......sound........quality........

..............The bitterness of poor quality is remembered long after the sweetness of todays funny gadgets low price has faded from memory........ . . . . . .....
Don't forget the past, the end of the world is upon us! Pretty soon it will all turn to dust!

Have big FUN ! !
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©2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Frank Sharp - You do not have permission to copy photos and words from this blog, and any content may be never used it for auctions or commercial purposes, however feel free to post anything you see here with a courtesy link back, btw a link to the original post here , is mandatory.
All sets and apparates appearing here are property of
Engineer Frank Sharp. NOTHING HERE IS FOR SALE !

Monday, April 25, 2011

PANASONIC TX-25MD4C YEAR 1998.
























































This set the PANASONIC  TX-25MD4C is a compact 25 inches color television Quintrix screen type but with many features.

 Quintrix is a name given to a flat and wide television tube made by Panasonic. Quintrix tubes were first introduced to the market in 1974. The word originates from the Latin word "quintum", which means "fifth". So far there are three models of Quintrix available:

    Quintrix,
    QuintrixF, and
    Quintrix SR (SR = Super Resolution)

The first Quintrix cathode ray tubes featured a prefocus lens that reduced beam diffusion, giving a sharper picture.

Tube Technology Panasonic has introduced several improvements to its Quintrix tubes, including the use of Super Pigment Technology. This involves adding middle gold pigment to the green phosphor. According to Panasonic this enhances the green colour reproduction. Use of a slight- ly tinted front glass reduces the ambient light reflection,   In the latest Quintrix tubes the scan -velocity modulation coil is integrated with the deflection yoke. Also enabling higher brightness and contrast levels to be achieved.

 The contrast level improvement is, in comparison with previous tubes, 15 per cent. A new configuration results in an oval electronic lens whose calibre is 1.7 times larger than that of a conven- tional lens system. This gives better edge focusing and sharper centre focusing. A new scan -velocity modulation coil varies the horizontal deflection field, again to improve the picture sharpness. The new coil has been integrated with the deflection yoke , giving more precise control of the horizontal deflection field. With a wider and flatter screen the electron beams suf- fer much distortion as they pass through the deflection fields. This effect can be reduced by making the vertical diameter of the electron beams smaller. A quadruple lens system and a new, rectangular control grid are used for this purpose. The reduced spot size gives a 20 per cent increase in sharpness compared with previous tube technology. The coma free yoke has special coma correctors to compensate for the barrel shaped magnetic field. As a result the RGB spots are more precise. Finally a new shadowmask has greater curvature, deflecting much of the electron beam energy.
From Full digital processing of all signals to Advanced OSD feature + Stereo sound + Teletext with many page memory + Multi AV socket + Multistandard features, was a top set with screens from 21 to 32 Inches types even real flat.

It features first time the EURO 4 CHASSIS based around ITT/MICRONAS DIGIT3000 CHIPSET.


The DIGITAL Colour television receiver or set , are known in which the majority of signal processing that takes place therein is carried out digitally. That is, a video or television signal is received in a conventional fashion using a known analog tuning circuit and then, following the tuning operation, the received analog television signal is converted into a digital signal and digitally processed before subsequently being converted back to an analog signal for display on a colour cathode ray tube.
In a conventional television receiver, all signals are analog-processed. Analog signal processing, however, has the problems at the video stage and thereafter. These problems stem from the general drawbacks of analog signal processing with regard to time-base operation, specifically, incomplete Y/C separation (which causes cross color and dot interference), various types of problems resulting in low picture quality, and low precision of synchronization. Furthermore, from the viewpoints of cost and ease of manufacturing the analog circuit, a hybrid configuration must be employed even if the main circuit comprises an IC. In addition to these disadvantages, many adjustments must be performed.

In order to solve the above problems, it is proposed to process all signals in a digital form from the video stage to the chrominance signal demodulation stage. In such a digital television receiver, various improvements in picture quality should result due to the advantages of digital signal processing.
Therefore digital television signal processing system introduced in 1984 by the Worldwide Semiconductor Group (Freiburg, West Germany) of International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation is described in an ITT Corporation publication titled "VLSI Digital TV System--DIGIT 2000." In that system color video signals, after being processed in digital (binary) form, are converted to analog form by means of digital-to-analog converters before being coupled to an image displaying kinescope. The analog color video signals are coupled to the kinescope via analog buffer amplifiers and video output kinescope driver amplifiers which provide video output signals at a high level suitable for driving intensity control electrodes of the kinescope.

The entire video processing and controlling for a color TV has been developed on a single chip in 0.8µ CMOS
technology. Modular design and submicron technology allow the economic integration of features in all classes
of TV sets.

Open architecture is the key word to the new DSP generation. Flexible standard building blocks have been defined that offer continuity and transparency of the entire system.
One IC contains the entire video and deflection processing and builds the heart of a modern color TV. Its performance and complexity allow the user to standardize his product development. Hardware and software appli-
cations can profit from the modularity as well as manufacturing, system support or maintenance. The main
features are:

– low cost, high performance
– all digital video processing
– multi-standard color decoder PAL/NTSC/SECAM
– 3 composite, 1 S–VHS input
– integrated high-quality AD/DA converters
– sync and deflection processing
– luminance and chrominance features, e.g.
peaking, color transient improvement
– programmable RGB matrix
– various digital interfaces
– embedded RISC controller (80 MIPS)
– one crystal, few external components
– single power supply 5 V
– 0.8µ CMOS Technology
– 68-pin PLCC or 64-pin Shrink DIL Package

Present-day, so-called digital television receivers generally contain at least two A/D converters ("analog-to-digital converters"). One of the A/D converters serves to convert the video signal from analog to digital form and is commonly located after the so-called sound trap, which keeps the sound-carrier signal out of the remaining signal. This first A/D converter is operated with a sampling signal whose frequency is usually four times the chrominance subcarrier frequency. Typically, this first A/D converter is a flash converter.
The second A/D converter is located at the beginning of the audio channel and, unlike the first-mentioned A/D converter, is generally a delta-sigma converter.

 During the further development and refinement of the current principle of a digital television receiver, it has turned out that each of the various current television standards, and also expected future television standards, require suitably designed subcircuits which lead to a great number of different types of integrated circuits. This is disadvantageous, particularly with regard to the mass production of integrated circuits.
It is, therefore, the object of the invention as claimed to provide a circuit principle for television receiving sections having at least one interface between the analog signal processing circuitry and the digital signal-processing circuitry which permits considerably simpler adaptation to different television standards and reduces the number of A/D converters required.
The main idea underlying the invention is to use a single A/D converter already at the output of the intermediate-frequency stage (i.e., where the signal, still in its analog format, lies in a frequency range between about 30 MHz and 40 MHz). The clock signal of this A/D converter has a frequency approximately equal to twice the bandwidth of the received signal (e.g., a frequency of about 20 MHz). After this A/D converter, the received signal is divided into a video-information-processing channel ("the video channel"), and an audio-information processing channel ("the audio channel"). Compared to the conventional solution described above, the need for the separate audio-channel A/D converter is eliminated, so that in a currently marketable system, a complete integrated circuit is saved.

Furthermore it adds for first time a  digital sound processor for processing multistandard sound signals which are fed as analog or digital signals from at least one source to the sound processor at baseband or higher frequencies.
Such sound processors are suitable for processing sound signals of various transmission standards for entertainment electronics, such as sound signals of different television standards, satellite receivers, video recorders, radios with traffic information message decoders, etc., but also sound signals which are generated by means of specific personal computer sound cards. Via control inputs, the processing in the digital sound processor is adapted to the respective transmission standard or sound source, and via internal processors, the desired sound impression (treble, bass, volume, stereo effect, etc.) is adjusted.
One example of such a digital sound processor is the MSP 3410D Multistandard Sound Processor of Micronas Intermetall, a commercially available module used in entertainment electronics equipment. A detailed description of this flexible sound processor can be found, for example, in the relevant data sheet, Edition Jan. 15, 1998, Order No. 6251-422-3PD.


SPECIFICATIONS
(Information in brackets { } refer to TX-25MD4C, [ ] TX-21MD4C)
Power Source: 220-240V AC, 50Hz
Power Consumption: 85W [71W]
Aerial Impedance: 75W unbalanced, Coaxial Type
Standby Power Consumption: 1,8W
Receiving System: PAL-B/G H, D/K, PAL-525/60
SECAM B/G, D/K
M.NTSC
NTSC (AV only)
Receiving Channels:
VHF E2-E12 VHF H1-H2 (ITALY)
VHF A-H (ITALY) VHF R1-R2
VHF R3-R5 VHF R6-R12
UHF E21-E69 CATV (S01-S05)
CATV S1-S10 (M1-M10) CATV S11-S20 (U1-U10)
CATV S21-S41 (HYPERBAND)
Intermediate Frequency:
Video 38,9MHz
Sound 33,4MHz, 33,16MHz, 32,4MHz
32,66MHz
Colour 34,47MHz (PAL)
34,5MHz, 34,65MHz (SECAM)
Video/Audio Terminals:
AUDIO MONITOR OUT Audio (RCAx2) 500mV rms1kW
AV1 IN Video (21 pin) 1V p-p 75W
Audio (21 pin) 500mV rms 10kW
RGB (21 pin)
AV1 OUT Video (21 pin) 1V p-p 75W
Audio (21 pin) 500mV rms 1kW
AV2 IN S-Video IN Y: 1V p-p 75W
(21 pin) C: 0.3V p-p 75W
AV2 OUT Video (21 pin) 1V p-p 75W
Audio (21 pin) 500mV rms 1kW
Selectable Output (21 pin)
AV3 IN Audio (RCAx2) 500mV rms10kW
Video (RCAx1) 1V p-p 75W
High Voltage: 28,5kV ±1kV{28,2kV ±1kV}
[28kV ±1kV]
Picture Tube: A66ECF50X41 66cm
{A59ECF50X41 59cm}
[A51ECQ51X01 51cm]
Audio Output: 2 x 15W (Music Power)
8W Impedance
Headphones 8W Impedance
Accessories supplied: Remote Control
2 x R6 (UM3) Batteries
Dimensions:
Height: 580 mm {531 mm} [478 mm]
Width: 666 mm {601 mm} [525 mm]
Depth: 472 mm {439 mm} [480 mm]
Net Weight: 31kg {25kg} [22kg]


One more comment about digital in 2000..............

Over the years we have learnt that one of the most important things in video/ TV technology is selecting the best system to use. We have also seen how difficult this can be. Prior to the start of the colour TV era in Europe there was an great to-do about the best system to adopt. The US NTSC system seemed an obvious choice to start with. It had been proved in use, and refine- ments had been devised. But alternative, better solutions were proposed - PAL and Secam. PAL proved to be a great success, in fact a good choice. 
The French Secam system seems to have worked just as well. Apart from the video tape battles of the Seventies, the next really big debate concerned digital TV. When it came to digital terrestrial TV (DTT), Europe and the USA again adopted different standards. 

One major difference is the modulation system used for transmission. Coded orthogonal frequency   division multiplexing (COFDM) was selected for the European DVB system, while in the USA a system called 8VSB was adopted. COFDM uses quadrature amplitude modulation of a number of orthogonal carriers that are spread across the channel bandwidth. Because of their number, each carrier has a relatively low bit rate. 
The main advantage of the system is its excellent behaviour under multipath reception conditions. 8VSB represents a rather older,  pre phase modulation technoogy: eight  state amplitude modulation of a single carrier, with a vestigial sideband. The decision on the US system was assigned to the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC), reporting to the FCC. The system it proposed was approved by the FCC on December 26th, 1996. The curious date might suggest that there had been a certain amount of politicking. In fact there had been an almighty row between the TV and computer industries about the video standard to adopt, the two fearing that one or other would gain an advantage as the technologies converged. It was 'resolved' by adopting a sort of   "open standard"  we are talking about resolution and scanning standards here - the idea apparently being that the technology would somehow sort itself out.

 There seems to have been rather less concern about the modulation standard. 8VSB was adopted because it was assumed to be able to provide a larger service area than the alternatives, including COFDM, for a given transmitter power. Well, the USA is a very large place! But the US TV industry, or at least some parts of it, is now having second thoughts. Once the FCC had made its decision, there was pressure to get on with digital TV. In early 1998 there were announce- ments about the start of transmissions and broadcasters assured the FCC that DTT would be available in the ten areas of greatest population concentration by May 1999. Rapid advances were expected, with an anticipated analogue TV switch -off in 2006. So far however things have not gone like that. At the end of 1999 some seventy DTI' transmitters were in operation, but Consumer Electronics Manufacturers Association estimates suggest that only some 50,000 sets and 5,000 STBs had been sold.

 There have been many reports of technical problems, in particular with reception in urban and hilly areas and the use of indoor aerials, also with video/audio sync and other matters. Poor reception with indoor aerials in urban conditions is of particular concern: that's how much of the population receives its TV. The UK was the first European country to start DTI', in late 1998 - at much the same time as in the USA. The contrast is striking. ONdigital had signed up well over 500,000 subscribers by the end of 1999, a much higher proportion of viewers than in the USA. Free STBs have played a part of course, but it's notable that DTT 's reception in the UK has been relatively hassle -free. In making this comparison it should also be remembered that the main aim of DTT technology differs in Europe and the USA. 

The main concern in Europe has been to provide additional channels. In the USA it has been to move to HDTV, in particular to provide a successor the NTSC system. There have been plenty of channels in the USA for many a year. For example the DirecTV satellite service started in mid 1994 and offers some 200 channels. Internationally, various countries have been comparing the US and European digital systems. They have overwhelmingly come down in favour of the DVB system. There have been some very damaging assessments of the ATSC standard. The present concern in the US TV industry results from this poor domestic take up and lack of international success. Did the FCC make a boob, in particular in the choice of 8VSB? Following compara- tive tests carried out by Sinclair Broadcasting Group Inc., the company has petitioned the FCC to adopt COFDM as an option in the ATSC standard. Not only did its tests confirm poor reception with indoor aerials: they also established that the greater coverage predicted for 8VSB failed to materialise in practice. Could the USA have two DTT transmission standards? It seems unlikely. It would involve dual standard receivers and non  standardisation of transmitters. In the all important business of system selection, it looks as if the FCC got it wrong.
              ....................................   It is obviously wasteful to duplicate terrestrial TV transmissions in analogue and digital form. Sooner or later transmissions will all be digital, since this is a more efficient use of spectrum space. The question is when? It would suit some to switch off the analogue transmitters as soon as possible. 2006 has been suggested as a time to start, with ana- logue transmissions finally ending in 2010. All very neat and tidy. Whether it will work out in that way is another matter. Strong doubts are already beginning to be aired. 
 The government has, quite properly, laid down conditions to be met before the switch off occurs. Basically that the digital signal coverage should equal that achieved for analogue TV, currently 99.4 per cent of the population, and that digital receiving equipment should be available at an affordable price. The real problem is that there is a difference between a coverage of 99.4 per cent and 99.4 per cent of the population actually having digital receiving equipment. Why should those who are interested in only free - to -air channels go out and buy/rent a digital receiver? It is already becoming evident that this represents a fair chunk of the population. 
The ITC has warned the government that the 2006-2010 timetable is in jeopardy. Peter Rogers, the ITC's chief executive, has said "we need to persuade people only interested in watching free -to -air television to switch to digital. "
Unless we do, there will be no switch - over." Well not quite, because the analogue receivers will eventually wear out and have to be replaced. But that could take a long, long time. Meanwhile many people will expect to be able to continue to watch their usual TV fare using their existing analogue receivers. 

Research carried out by Culture Secretary Chris Smith's department has established that between forty and fifty per cent of the population expects the BBC licence to cover their TV viewing, which means what they get at present in analogue form. A substantial percentage of the population simply isn't interested in going digital. In fact take up of integrated receiver -decoders, as opposed to the free digital set -top boxes, has so far been very slow. 
Of five million TV sets sold in the UK year 1999 , only 10,000 were digital. There are important factors apart from overall coverage and how many people have sets. There is the extension of coverage, which becomes more difficult to achieve eco- nomically as the number of those not covered decreases. There is the problem of reception quality. And there is the question of domestic arrangements and convenience. Extending coverage to the last ten fifteen per cent of the population by means of conventional terrestrial transmitters will be expensive. Mr Smith's department seems to have conceded that other methods of signal delivery may have to be adopted - by satellite, by microwave links or by cable. The latter has of course never been economic where few households are involved. 
The frequency planners have been trying to find ways of increasing coverage even to well populated areas. There are so many areas where problems of one sort or another make the provision of DTT difficult. Satellite TV is the obvious solution. 
The time may well come when it is wondered why anyone bothered with DTT. Signal quality is becoming an increasingly important factor as the digital roll out continues. In areas where the signal is marginal, viewers could experience the extreme irritation of picture break up or complete loss like even todays. This is quite apart from the actual quality of the channel, which depends on the number of bits per second used. There is a maximum number of bits per multiplex, the total being shared by several channels. The fewer the bits, the poorer the picture in terms of definition and rendering. 

There have already been complaints about poor quality. The question of domestic arrangements is one that has not so far received adequate public attention. Most households 2000 nowadays don't have just one TV set that the family watches. They have a main one, probably, almost certainly one or more VCRs, and several other sets around the house to serve various purposes. What 'the percentage of households that have digital TV' should really mean is the percentage willing to replace all this equipment. It will be expensive, and people would not be happy if they were told to throw away their other equipment when they get a single nice new all  singing all dancing widescreen digital TV set. It fact there would be uproar. The move from analogue to digital is not like that from 405 to 625 lines, which went fairly smoothly.

In those days few people had video equipment or a multitude of sets. The transition to digital is not going to be smooth, and the suggestion of a switch off during 2006-2010 already looks totally unrealistic. Unless the government subsidises or gives away digital TV sets - and why should it? - people will expect their existing equipment to continue to be usable.  

So it's likely that analogue TV will be with us for many years yet. But that would be the end of analogue too. 

.............................Indeed...............................


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Panasonic Corporation (Panasonikku Kabushiki-gaisha) (TYO: 6752, NYSE: PC), formerly known as Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. ( Matsushita Denki Sangyō Kabushiki-gaisha), is a Japanese multinational consumer electronics corporation headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan. Its main business is in electronics manufacturing and it produces products under a variety of names including Panasonic and Technics. Since its founding in 1918, it has grown to become the largest Japanese electronics producer. In addition to electronics, Panasonic offers non-electronic products and services such as home renovation services. Panasonic was ranked the 89th-largest company in the world in 2009 by the Forbes Global 2000 and is among the Worldwide Top 20 Semiconductor Sales Leaders !

History

Panasonic was founded in 1918 by Konosuke Matsushita first selling duplex lamp sockets. In 1927, it produced a bicycle lamp, the first product it marketed under the brand name National. It operated factories in Japan and other parts of Asia through the end of World War II, producing electrical components and appliances such as light fixtures, motors, and electric irons. After World War II, Panasonic regrouped and began to supply the post war boom in Japan with radios and appliances, as well as bicycles. Matsushita's brother-in-law, Toshio Iue founded Sanyo as a subcontractor for components after WWII. Sanyo grew to become a competitor to Panasonic. Name For 90 years since establishment, the name of the company was always topped with "松下" ("Matsushita"). The company's name before 1 October 2008 had been "Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.", used since 1935. In 1927, the company founder adopted a brand name "National" ( National) for a new lamp product, knowing "national" meant "of or relating to a people, a nation."[5] In 1955, the company labeled its export audio speakers and lamps "PanaSonic", which was the first time it used its "Panasonic" brand name. The company began to use a brand name "Technics" in 1965.[6] The use of multiple brands lasted for some decades.[6] In May 2003, the company put "Panasonic" as its global brand, and set its global brand slogan, "Panasonic ideas for life."[7] The company began to unify its brands to "Panasonic" and, by March 2004 replaced "National" for products and outdoor signboards, except for those in Japan[7]. On January 10, 2008, the company announced that it would change its name to "Panasonic Corporation" (effective on October 1, 2008) and phase out the brand "National" in Japan, replacing it with the global brand "Panasonic" (by March 2010). The name change was approved at a shareholders' meeting on June 26, 2008 after consultation with the Matsushita family. Panasonic owns RCTI, Global TV and MNC TV. Electronics In 1961, Konosuke Matsushita traveled to the United States and met with American dealers. Panasonic began producing television sets for the U.S. market under the Panasonic brand name, and expanded the use of the brand to Europe in 1979. The company used the National trademark outside of North America during the 1950s through the 1970s. (The trademark could not be used probably due to discriminatory application of trademark laws where brands like General Motors were registrable.) It sold televisions, hi-fidelity stereo receivers, multi-band shortwave radios, and marine radio direction finders, often exported to North America under various U.S. brand names. The company also developed a line of home appliances such as rice cookers for the Japanese and Asian markets. Rapid growth resulted in the company opening manufacturing plants around the world. National/Panasonic quickly developed a reputation for well-made, reliable products. The company debuted a hi-fidelity audio speaker in Japan in 1965 with the brand Technics. This line of high quality stereo components became worldwide favorites. The most famous product still made today is the SL-1200 record player, known for its high performance, precision, and durability. Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, Panasonic continued to produce high-quality specialized electronics for niche markets such as shortwave radios, as well as developing a successful line of stereo receivers, CD players, and other components. Since 2004, Toyota has used Panasonic batteries for its Toyota Prius, an environmentally friendly car made in Japan. On January 19, 2006 Panasonic announced that, starting in February, it will stop producing analog televisions (then 30% of its total TV business) to concentrate on digital TVs. On November 3, 2008 Panasonic and Sanyo were in talks, resulting in the eventual acquisition of Sanyo. The merger was completed in December 2009, and resulted in a mega-corporation with revenues over ¥11.2 trillion (around $110 billion). As part of what will be Japan's biggest electronics company, the Sanyo brand and most of the employees will be retained as a subsidiary. In November 1999, the Japan Times reported that Panasonic planned to develop a "next generation first aid kit" called the Electronic Health Checker. At the time, the target market was said to be elderly people, especially those living in rural areas where medical help might not be immediately available, so it was planned that the kit would include support for telemedicine. The kits were then in the testing stage, with plans for eventual overseas distribution, to include the United States. In recent years the company has been involved with the development of high-density optical disc standards intended to eventually replace the DVD and the SD memory card. On July 29, 2010 Panasonic reached an agreement to acquire the remaining shares of Panasonic Electric Works and Sanyo shares for $9.4 billion. Panasonic and Universal Panasonic used to own Universal Studios, then known as the Music Corporation of America, since acquiring the company in 1990 but sold it to Seagram in 1995. Universal Studios is now a unit of NBC Universal.

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