Richtige Fernseher haben Röhren!

Richtige Fernseher haben Röhren!

In Brief: On this site you will find pictures and information about some of the electronic, electrical and electrotechnical technology relics that the Frank Sharp Private museum has accumulated over the years .

Premise: There are lots of vintage electrical and electronic items that have not survived well or even completely disappeared and forgotten.

Or are not being collected nowadays in proportion to their significance or prevalence in their heyday, this is bad and the main part of the death land. The heavy, ugly sarcophagus; models with few endearing qualities, devices that have some over-riding disadvantage to ownership such as heavy weight,toxicity or inflated value when dismantled, tend to be under-represented by all but the most comprehensive collections and museums. They get relegated to the bottom of the wants list, derided as 'more trouble than they are worth', or just forgotten entirely. As a result, I started to notice gaps in the current representation of the history of electronic and electrical technology to the interested member of the public.


Following this idea around a bit, convinced me that a collection of the peculiar alone could not hope to survive on its own merits, but a museum that gave equal display space to the popular and the unpopular, would bring things to the attention of the average person that he has previously passed by or been shielded from. It's a matter of culture. From this, the Obsolete Technology Tellye Web Museum concept developed and all my other things too. It's an open platform for all electrical Electronic TV technology to have its few, but NOT last, moments of fame in a working, hand-on environment. We'll never own Colossus or Faraday's first transformer, but I can show things that you can't see at the Science Museum, and let you play with things that the Smithsonian can't allow people to touch, because my remit is different.

There was a society once that was the polar opposite of our disposable, junk society. A whole nation was built on the idea of placing quality before quantity in all things. The goal was not “more and newer,” but “better and higher" .This attitude was reflected not only in the manufacturing of material goods, but also in the realms of art and architecture, as well as in the social fabric of everyday life. The goal was for each new cohort of children to stand on a higher level than the preceding cohort: they were to be healthier, stronger, more intelligent, and more vibrant in every way.

The society that prioritized human, social and material quality is a Winner. Truly, it is the high point of all Western civilization. Consequently, its defeat meant the defeat of civilization itself.

Today, the West is headed for the abyss. For the ultimate fate of our disposable society is for that society itself to be disposed of. And this will happen sooner, rather than later.

OLD, but ORIGINAL, Well made, Funny, Not remotely controlled............. and not Made in CHINA.

How to use the site:

- If you landed here via any Search Engine, you will get what you searched for and you can search more using the search this blog feature provided by Google. You can visit more posts scrolling the left blog archive of all posts of the month/year,
or you can click on the main photo-page to start from the main page. Doing so it starts from the most recent post to the older post simple clicking on the Older Post button on the bottom of each page after reading , post after post.

You can even visit all posts, time to time, when reaching the bottom end of each page and click on the Older Post button.

- If you arrived here at the main page via bookmark you can visit all the site scrolling the left blog archive of all posts of the month/year pointing were you want , or more simple You can even visit all blog posts, from newer to older, clicking at the end of each bottom page on the Older Post button.
So you can see all the blog/site content surfing all pages in it.

- The search this blog feature provided by Google is a real search engine. If you're pointing particular things it will search IT for you; or you can place a brand name in the search query at your choice and visit all results page by page. It's useful since the content of the site is very large.

Note that if you don't find what you searched for, try it after a period of time; the site is a never ending job !

Every CRT Television saved let revive knowledge, thoughts, moments of the past life which will never return again.........

Many contemporary "televisions" (more correctly named as displays) would not have this level of staying power, many would ware out or require major services within just five years or less and of course, there is that perennial bug bear of planned obsolescence where components are deliberately designed to fail and, or manufactured with limited edition specificities..... and without considering........picture......sound........quality........

..............The bitterness of poor quality is remembered long after the sweetness of todays funny gadgets low price has faded from memory........ . . . . . .....
Don't forget the past, the end of the world is upon us! Pretty soon it will all turn to dust!

Have big FUN ! !
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©2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Frank Sharp - You do not have permission to copy photos and words from this blog, and any content may be never used it for auctions or commercial purposes, however feel free to post anything you see here with a courtesy link back, btw a link to the original post here , is mandatory.
All sets and apparates appearing here are property of
Engineer Frank Sharp. NOTHING HERE IS FOR SALE !

Sunday, May 15, 2011

TELEFUNKEN PALCOLOR HIFI 292 PIP "MILLENNIUM" CHASSIS 618 A-2 PIP (ICC5341) INTERNAL VIEW.













































































































The CHASSIS  618 A-2 PIP  (ICC5341) is the most advanced version of the Thomson CHASSIS ICC5.

It 's coded ICC5341 and was introducing the IMC (Interactive menu control) feature on the chassis base.

It's full multistandard even in the PIP Unit.

It's complex and sophisticated all way.

As any ICC5 it have had a high rate of failure due to dry joints all around the chassis.

When they're fully reworked they give almost never a problem after.


TELEFUNKEN  PALCOLOR HIFI 292 PIP  "MILLENNIUM"  CHASSIS  618 A-2 PIP  (ICC5341) CIRCUIT DESCRIPTIONS:

























TELEFUNKEN  PALCOLOR HIFI 292 PIP  "MILLENNIUM"  CHASSIS  618 A-2 PIP  (ICC5341)COLOR TV SCANNING AND POWER SUPPLY PROCESSOR TEA2029C

DESCRIPTION
The TEA2029C is a complete (horizontal and vertical)
deflection processor with secondary to primary
SMPS control for color TV sets.

DEFLECTION .CERAMIC 500kHz RESONATOR FREQUENCY
REFERENCE .NO LINE AND FRAME OSCILLATOR ADJUSTMENT
.DUAL PLL FOR LINE DEFLECTION .HIGH PERFORMANCE SYNCHRONIZATION .SUPER SANDCASTLE OUTPUT .VIDEO IDENTIFICATION CIRCUIT .AUTOMATIC 50/60Hz STANDARD IDENTIFICATION
.EXCELLENT INTERLACING CONTROL .SPECIALPATENTED FRAME SYNCHRO DEVICE
FOR VCR OPERATION .FRAME SAW-TOOTH GENERATOR .FRAME PHASE MODULATOR FOR THYRISTOR
SMPS CONTROL .ERROR AMPLIFIER AND PHASE MODULATOR
.SYNCHRONIZATION WITH HORIZONTAL
DEFLECTION .SECURITY CIRCUIT AND START UP PROCESSOR.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION
This integrated circuit uses I2L bipolar technology
and combines analog signal processing with digital
processing.
Timing signals are obtainedfrom a voltage-controlled
oscillator (VCO) operatingat 500KHzby means
of a cheap ceramic resonator. This avoids the
frequency adjustment normally required with line
and frame oscillators.
A chain of dividers and appropriate logic circuitry
produce very accurately defined sampling pulses
and the necessary timing signals.
The principal functions implemented are :
- Horizontal scanning processor.
- Frame scanning processor. Two applications are
possible :
- D Class : Power stage using an external
thyristor.
- B Class : Powerstageusing an externalpower
amplifier with fly-back generator
such as the TDA8170.
- Secondary switch mode power regulation.
The SMPS output synchronize a primary I.C.
(TEA2260/61)at the mains part.
This concept allows ACTIVE STANDBY facilities.
- Dual phase-locked loop horizontal scanning.
- High performance frameand line synchronization
with interlacing control.
- Video identification circuit.
- Super sandcastle.
- AGC key pulse output.
- Automatic 50-60Hz standard identification.
- VCR input for PLL time constant and frame synchro
switching.
- Frame saw-tooth generator and phase modulator.
- Switchingmode regulated power supplycomprising
error amplifier and phase modulator.
- Security circuit and start-up processor.
- 500kHzVCO
The circuit is supplied in a 28 pin DIP case.
VCC = 12V.
Synchronization Separator
Line synchronization separator is clamped to
black level of input video signal with synchronization
pulse bottom level measurement.
The synchronization pulses are divided centrally
between the black level and the synchronization
pulse bottom level, to improve performance on
video signals in noise conditions.
Frame Synchronization
Frame synchronization is fully integrated (no external
capacitor required).
The frame timing identification logic permits automatic
adaptation to 50 - 60Hz standards or non-interlaced
video.
An automatic synchronization window width system
provides :
- fast frame capture (6.7ms wide window),
- good noise immunity (0.4ms narrow window).
The internal generator starts the discharge of the
saw-tooth generator capacitor so that it is not disturbed
by line fly back effects.
Thanks to the logic control, the beginning of the
charge phase does not depend on any disturbing
effect of the line fly-back.
A 32ms timing is automatically applied on standardized
transmissions, for perfect interlacing.
In VCR mode, the discharge time is controlled by
an internal monostable independent of the line
frequency and gives a direct frame synchronization.
Horizontal Scanning
The horizontalscanningfrequencyis obtainedfrom
the 500kHz VCO.
The circuit uses two phase-locked loops (PLL) :
the first one controls the frequency, the second one
controls the relative phase of the synchronization
and line fly-back signals.
The frequency PLL has two switched time constants
to provide :
- capture with a short time constant,
- good noise immunity after capture with a long
time constant.
The output pulse has a constant duration of 26ms,
independent of VCC and any delay in switching off
the scanning transistor.
Video Identification
The horizontal synchronization signal is sampled
by a 2ms pulse within the synchronization pulse.
The signal is integrated by an external capacitor.
The identification function provides three different
levels :
- 0V : no video identification
- 6V : 60Hz video identification
- 12V : 50Hz video identification
This information may be used for timing research
in the case of frequency or voltage synthetizer type
receivers, and for audio muting.
Super Sandcastle with 3 levels : burst, line flyback,
frame blanking
In the event of vertical scanning failure, the frame
blanking level goes high to protect the tube.
Frame blanking time (start with reset of Frame
divider) is 24 lines.
VCR Input
This provides for continuous use of the short time
constant of the first phase-locked loop (frequency).
In VCR mode, the frame synchronization window widens out to a search window and there is no
delay of frame fly-back (direct synchronization).
Frame Scanning
FRAME SAW-TOOTH GENERATOR. The current
to charge the capacitoris automatically switched to
60Hz operation to maintain constant amplitude.
FRAME PHASE MODULATOR (WITH TWO DIFFERENTIAL
INPUTS). The output signal is a pulse
at the line frequency, pulse width modulatedby the
voltage at the differential pre-amplifier input.
This signal is used to control a thyristor which
provides the scanning current to the yoke. The
saw-tooth output is a low impedance,however, and
can therefore be used in class B operation with a
power amplifier circuit.
Switch Mode Power Supply (SMPS) Secondary
to Primary Regulation
This power supply uses a differential error amplifier
with an internal reference voltage of 1.26V and a
phase modulator operating at the line frequency.
The powertransistor is turnedoff bythe falling edge
of the horizontal saw-tooth.
The ”soft start” device imposes a very small conduction
angle on starting up, this angle progressively
increases to its nominal regulation value.
The maximum conductionangle may be monitored
by forcing a voltage on pin 15. This pin may also
be used for current limitation.
The outputpulse is sent to the primaryS.M.P.S. I.C.
(TEA2261) via a low cost synchro transformer.
Security Circuit and Start Up Processor
When the security input (pin 28) is at a voltage
exceeding 1.26V the three outputs are simultaneously
cut off until this voltagedrops below the 1.26V
threshold again. In this case the switch mode
power supply is restarted by the ”soft start” system.
If this cycle is repeated three times, the three
outputs are cut off definitively. To reset the safety
logic circuits, VCC must be zero volt.
This circuit eliminates the risk to switch off the TV
receiver in the event of a flash affecting the tube.
On starting up, the horizontal and vertical scanning
functions come into operation at VCC = 6V. The
power supply then comes into operation progressively.
On shutting down, the three functions are interrupted
simultaneously after the first line fly-back.




APPLICATION INFORMATION ON FRAME
SCANNING IN SWITCHED MODE:


Fundamentals (see Figure 80)
The secondary winding of EHT transformer provides
the energy required by frame yoke.
The frame current modulation is achieved by
modulating the horizontal saw-tooth current and
subsequent integration by a ”L.C” network to reject
the horizontal frequency component.

General Description
The basic circuit is the phase comparator ”C1”
which compares the horizontal saw-tooth and the
output voltage of Error Amplifier ”A”.
The comparator output will go ”high” when the
horizontal saw-tooth voltage is higher than the ”A”
output voltage. Thus, the Pin 4 output signal is
switched in synchronization with the horizontal frequency
and the duty cycle is modulated at frame
frequency.
A driver stage delivers the current required by the
external power switch.
The external thyristor provides for energy transfer
between transformer and frame yoke.
The thyristor will conduct during the last portion of
horizontal trace phase and for half of the horizontal
retrace.
The inverse parallel-connected diode ”D” conducts
during the second portion of horizontal retrace and
at the beginning of horizontal trace phase.
Main advantages of this system are :
- Power thyristor soft ”turn-on”
Once the thyristor has been triggered, the current
gradually rises from 0 to IP, where IP will reach
the maximumvalue at the end of horizontal trace.
The slope current is determined by, the current
available through the secondary winding, the
yoke impedance and the ”L.C.” filter characteristics.
- Power thyristor soft ”turn-off”
The secondary output current begins decreasing
and falls to 0 at the middle of retrace. The thyristor
is thus automatically ”turned-off”.
- Excellent efficiency of power stage dueto very
low ”turn-on” and ”turn-off” switching losses.

Frame Flyback
During flyback, due to the loop time constant, the
frame yoke current cannot be locked onto the
reference saw-tooth. Thus the output of amplifier
”A” will remain high and the thyristor is blocked.
The scanning current will begin flowing through
diode ”D”. As a consequence, the capacitor ”C”
starts charging upto the flyback voltage.The thyristor
is triggeredas soon as the yoke current reaches
the maximum positive value.



TDA4443 MULTISTANDARD VIDEO IF AMPLIFIERDESCRIPTION
The TDA4443 is a Video IF amplifier with standard
switch for multistandard colour or monochromeTV
sets, and VTR’s.

SWITCHING OFF THE IF AMPLIFIER WHEN
OPERATING IN VTR MODE .DEMODULATION OF NEGATIVE OR POSITIVE
IF SIGNALS. THE OUTPUT REMAINS
ON THE SAME POLARITY IN EVERY CASE .IF AGC AUTOMATICALLY ADJUSTED TO
THE ACTUALSTANDARD .TWO AGC POSSIBILITIES FOR B/G MODE :
1. GATED AGC
2. UNGATED AGC ON SYNC. LEVEL AND
CONTROLLED DISCHARGE DEPENDENT
ON THE AVERAGE SIGNAL LEVEL FOR VTR
AND PERI TV APPLICATIONS
FOR STANDARD L : FAST AGC ON PEAK
WHITE BY CONTROLLED DISCHARGE .POSITIVE OR NEGATIVE GATING PULSE .EXTREMELY HIGH INPUT SENSITIVITY .LOW DIFFERENTIAL DISTORTION .CONSTANT INPUT IMPEDANCE .VERY HIGH SUPPLY VOLTAGE REJECTION .FEW EXTERNAL COMPONENTS .LOW IMPEDANCE VIDEO OUTPUT .SMALL TOLERANCES OF THE FIXED VIDEO
SIGNALAMPLITUDE .ADJUSTABLE, DELAYED AGC FOR PNP
TUNERS.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION
This video IF processing circuit integrates the following
functional blocks : .Three symmetrical, very stable, gain controlled
wideband amplifier stages - without feedback
by a quasi-galvanic coupling. .Demodulator controlled by the picture carrier .Video output amplifier with high supply voltage
rejection .Polarity switch for the video output signal .AGC on peak white level .GatedAGC .Discharge control .Delayed tuner AGC .At VTR Reading mode the video output signal
is at ultra white level.



TDA4445A SOUND IF AMPLIFIER


.QUADRATURE INTERCARRIER DEMODULATOR
.VERY HIGH INPUT SENSITIVITY .GOODSIGNALTO NOISE RATIO .FAST AVERAGINGAGC .IF AMPLIFIER CAN BE SWITCHED OFF FOR
VTR MODE .GOODAM SUPPRESSION .OUTPUT SIGNAL STABILIZED AGAINST
SUPPLY VOLTAGE VARIATIONS .VERY FEW EXTERNAL COMPONENTS
DESCRIPTION
TDA4445A:
Sound IF amplifier, with FM processing for quasi
parallel sound system.
TDA4445B:
Sound IF amplifier, with FM processing and AM
demodulator, for multi-standard sound TV appliances.
TDA4445Badditionnal :
Bistandard applications (B/G and L)
No adjustment of the AM demodulator
Low AMdistortion.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION
This circuit includes the following functions : .Three symmetrical and gain controlled wide
band amplifier stages, which are extremely stable
by quasiDC coupling without feedback. .Averaging AGC with discharge control circuit .AGC voltage generator
Quasi parallel sound operation : .High phase accuracy of the carrier signal processing,
independentfrom AM .Linear quadrature demodulator .Sound-IF-amplifier stage with impedance converter
AM-Demodulation (only TDA4445B) : .Carrier controlled demodulator .Audio frequency stage with impedance converter
.Averaging low passAGC.

TELEFUNKEN  PALCOLOR HIFI 292 PIP  "MILLENNIUM"  CHASSIS  618 A-2 PIP  (ICC5341) CHASSIS ICC5 Switched mode power supply transformer


A switched mode power supply transformer, particularly for a television receiver, including a primary winding and a secondary winding with the primary winding and the secondary winding each being subdivided into a plurality of respective partial windings. The partial windings of the primary lie in a first group of chambers and the partial windings of the secondary lie in a second group of chambers of a chamber coil body, and the chambers of both groups are nested or interleaved with one another.







1. A switched mode power supply transformer, particularly for a television receiver, comprising in combination:
a primary winding and a secondary winding, with said primary winding being subdivided into three partial windings and said secondary winding being subdivided into two partial windings;
a chamber coil body having a plurality of chambers;
said partial windings of said primary winding being disposed only in a first group of said chambers, and said partial windings of said secondary winding being disposed only in a second group of said chambers, with each of said partial windings being disposed in a respective one of said chambers;
said chambers of said first group being interleaved with said chambers of said second group such that they alternate in sequence with said primary partial windings and said secondary partial windings being alternatingly disposed in five successive said chambers, so as to generate the major operating voltage at said secondary winding;
an additional secondary winding for generating a further operating voltage, said additional secondary winding likewise being subdivided into a plurality of partial windings; and,
said partial windings of said additional secondary winding are disposed only in respective said chambers of said second group below any of said partial windings of said secondary winding.


2. A transformer as defined in claim 1 wherein the total number of said chambers is six.

3. A transformer as defined in claim 1 wherein the width of the narrowest of said chambers is approximately 1 mm.

4. A transformer as defined in claim 1 or 2 wherein the widths of said chambers are different.

5. A transformer as defined in claim 1 or 2 wherein the total width of all of said chambers is only approximately 20 mm, whereby a flat and optimally coupled transformer is realized.

6. A transformer as defined in claim 1 wherein said additional secondary winding provides an operating voltage for a load which has a fluctuating current input.

7. A transformer as defined in claim 1 wherein said partial windings of said additional secondary winding are connected in parallel.

8. A transformer as defined in claim 1 wherein said partial windings of said primary winding are connected in series.

9. A transformer as defined in claim 1 or 8 wherein said partial windings of said secondary winding are connected in series.

10. A transformer as defined in claim 1 further comprising a plurality of auxiliary primary windings disposed in one chamber of said first group which is disposed in approximately the center of said first group and above the said partial winding of said primary winding disposed in said one chamber of said first group.

11. A transformer as defined in claim 1 wherein all of said partial winding disposed in said chambers of both said groups are wound with wire having the same diameter.

12. A switched mode power supply transformer as defined in claim 1 or 10 wherein: said coil body has six of of said chambers; said additional secondary winding is subdivided into three said partial windings; and two of said partial windings of said additional secondary winding are disposed below respective ones of said partial windings of said secondary winding and the third said partial winding of said additional secondary winding is disposed in the sixth said chamber.

13. A switched mode power supply transformer as defined in claim 10 further comprising at least one further secondary winding disposed in one of said chambers of said second group above any partial secondary winding present in said one of said chambers.

14. A switched mode power supply transformer, particularly for a television receiver, comprising in combination:
a primary winding and a secondary winding, with said primary winding and said secondary winding each being subdivided into a plurality of partial windings;
a chamber coil body having a plurality of chambers;
said partial windings of said primary winding being disposed only in a first group of said chambers, and said partial windings of said secondary winding being disposed only in a second group of said chambers with each of said partial windings being disposed in a respective one of said chambers;
said chambers of said first group being interleaved with said chambers of said second group such that said primary partial windings and said secondary partial windings are alternatingly disposed in successive said chambers, so as to generate the major operating voltage at said secondary winding;
an additional secondary winding for generating a further operating voltage, said additional secondary winding likewise being subdivided into a plurality of partial windings, and said partial windings of said additional secondary winding are disposed only in respective said chambers of said second group below any of said partial windings of said secondary winding.


15. A switched mode power supply transformer as defined in claim 1 or 14 wherein each of said partial windings of said primary winding contains the same number of turns and each of said partial windings of said secondary winding contains the same number of turns.

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to a switched mode power supply transformer, particularly for a television receiver.
In communications transmissions devices, particularly in television receivers, it is known to effect the desired dc decoupling from the mains by means of so-called switched mode power supply transformers. Such switched mode power supply transformers are substantially smaller and lighter in weight than a mains transformer for the same power operating at 50 Hz, because they operate at a significantly higher frequency of about 20-30 kHz. Such a switched mode power supply transformer (hereinafter called SMPS transformer) generally includes a primary side with a primary winding serving as the operating winding for the switch and further additional auxiliary windings, as well as a secondary side with a secondary winding for generating the essential operating voltage and possibly further additional windings for generating further operating voltages of different magnitude and polarity. The secondary and primary are insulated from one another as prescribed by VDE and have the necessary dielectric strength so that there is no danger of contact between voltage carrying parts on the secondary. A switched mode power supply (SMPS) circuit for a tv-receiver is described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,967,182, issued June 29, 1976.
A further requirement placed on such an SMPS transformer is that the stray inductance at least of the primary winding and of the secondary winding should be as small as possible. With too high a stray inductance, a transient behavior may develop during the switching operation which would not assure optimum switch operation of the switching transistor connected to the primary winding and would endanger this transistor by taking on too much power. Moreover, an increased stray inductance undesirably increases the internal resistance of the voltage sources for the individual operating voltages.
It is known to design the windings for such transformers as layered windings. Such layered windings, however, contain feathered intermediate foil layers and, after manufacture, generally require that the coil or the complete transformer be encased in order to insure VDE safety. Use as a chamber winding in television receivers presently does not take place because of the problems to be discussed below. A chamber winding would have the particular advantage that it could be wound more easily and economically by automatic machines. when using a chamber winding for a switched mode power supply, the detailed insulation between the primary and the secondary would be realized initially by two chambers with one of these chambers being filled only with the windings of the primary and the other of these chambers being filled only with the windings of the secondary. However, with such an arrangement there would exist only slight coupling between the primary and the secondary and thus an undesirably high stray inductance. If, on the other hand, the number of chambers were selected to be substantially larger, the transformer becomes more expensive and unnecessarily large. Moreover, a larger core would be required. Consequently, in the past, no television receiver has been introduced that included an SMPS transformer.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
It is the object of the present invention to provide an SMPS transformer designed in the chamber wound technique which permits economical automatic winding, i.e. can be wound with but a single type of wire, has a structure which is spatially narrow and as flat as possible, provides the required insulation between the primary and secondary windings, and has a low stray inductance. The transformer should not be encased or saturated and nevertheless should produce no interfering noise during operation. The transformer should be able to be held in a circuit board without mechanical aids merely by its connecting terminals which are soldered to the circuit board.
The above object is basically achieved according to the present invention in that the transformer for a switched mode power supply, particularly for a television receiver, comprises: a primary winding and a secondary winding with the primary and secondary windings each being subdivided into a plurality of partial windings; and a chamber coil body with a plurality of chambers; and wherein the partial windings of the primary winding are disposed in a first group of chambers of the coil body, the partial windings of the secondary winding are disposed in a second group of chambers of the coil body, and the chambers of the first and second groups are interleaved.
Due to the fact that the individual windings or partial windings of the primary are disposed only in chambers of the first group and the windings or partial windings of the secondary are disposed only in chambers of the second group, i.e. primary and secondary are distributed to separate chambers, the necessary dielectric strength between primary and secondary is assured. By dividing each of the primary and secondary windings to a respective plurality or group of chambers and, due to the interleaved or nested arrangement of the chambers of the primary and the secondary, the desired fixed coupling between primary and secondary, and thus the desired low stray inductance at the primary and secondary, are realized. It has been found that a total number of chambers in the order of magnitude of six constitutes an economically favorable solution. With a smaller number of chambers, the coupling between primary and secondary is reduced. With a larger number of chambers, however, either the individual chambers become too small or the entire transformer, and particularly the core, become too large.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a circuit diagram for a preferred embodiment of a switched mode power supply transformer according to the invention.
FIG. 2 is a schematic partial sectional view showing the distribution of the individual windings of FIG. 1 to different chambers according to the invention.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
FIG. 1 shows a transformer intended for a switched mode power supply for a television receiver with a power output between 40 and 150 watts. The transformer includes a primary side P and a secondary side S which, while maintaining the required dielectric strength of, for example, 10,000 V, are galvanically decoupled or separated from one another. The primary side P includes a primary winding 1 which, as the operating winding, will lie in the collector circuit of a switching transistor switched at about 20-30 kHz. The primary winding 1 is divided into three partial windings 1a, 1b and 1c which are connected in series. When utilized in a television receiver, the beginning of partial winding 1a and the end of partial winding 1c are connected into the collector circuit of the switching transistor, while the taps between the partial windings 1a-1b and 1b-1c are not utilized, but rather form supporting points for the connection of the terminals of the partial windings. The primary side P also includes an additional winding 3 which feeds the feedback path with which the primary winding 1a-1c is designed as a self-resonant circuit. Moreover, the primary side P includes an additional winding 4 for regulating the moment of current flow in the switching transistor in the sense of stabilizing the amplitude of the output voltages on the secondary side S.
The secondary side S initially includes the secondary winding 2 from which is obtained, via a rectifier circuit (not shown), the main operating voltage U1. The secondary winding 2 is divided into two series connected partial windings 2a and 2b. Additionally, the secondary winding S includes a winding 5 for generating an operating voltage for the video amplifier and a further winding 6 for generating the operating voltage for the vertical deflection stage of a television receiver. Moreover, an additional secondary winding 7 is provided from which, after rectification, the operating voltage or the audio output stage of the receiver is obtained. Winding 7 comprises three partial windings 7a, 7b, 7c which are connected in parallel. The audio output stage of a television receiver has a greatly fluctuating current input between 50 mA and 1000 mA so that the load of the secondary side S varies considerably. This variation in load may effect an undesirable change in the operating voltage U1 which also influences the horizontal deflection amplitude. This undesirable dependency can be reduced in that the coupling between winding 7 and winding 4 is dimensioned greater, for regulating purposes, than the coupling between winding 2 and winding 4. This solution is described in greater detail in Federal Republic of Germany Offenlegungsschrift (laid open application) DE-OS No. 2,749,847 of May 10, 1979. This increased coupling between windings 7 and 4 is realized in the present case by the three parallel connected windings 7a, 7b, 7c. Finally, the secondary S includes a further winding 8 which serves to generate, after rectification, a negative operating voltage of -30 V.
FIG. 2 shows one half of the chamber coil body 9 for the individual windings of FIG. 1, with the body 9 including a total of six chambers 10. The size and particularly the widths of the individual chambers 10 can vary with respect to one another and the widths may all be different. Preferably, the width of the narrowest chamber 10 is about 1 mm and the total width of all six chambers is only approximately 20 mm so as to realize a flat and optimally coupled transformer.
As shown, one third of the primary winding 1, in the form of respective partial windings 1a, 1b and 1c, is distributed to each of the first, third and fifth chambers 10 of the coil body 9. The additional primary windings 3 and 4 are disposed in the third chamber 10 above the partial winding 1b. One half of the secondary winding 2, in the form of respective partial windings 2a, 2b, is distributed to each of the second and fourth chambers 10 of the coil body 9. The three partial windings 7a, 7b and 7c of the additional secondary winding 7 for the audio output stage are distributed to the second, fourth and sixth chambers 10, respectively, with the partial windings 7a-7c being disposed closest to the longitudinal axis of the coil body 9 and thus below any partial secondary winding 2a, 2b or other secondary winding which may be located in the same chamber. That is, the partial windings 7a and 7b are disposed below the partial windings 2a and 2b, respectively, in the respective second and fourth chambers 10, and below the additional secondary windings 5 and 8 in the sixth chamber 10. Further winding 6 is disposed above partial secondary winding 2b.
As can be seen in FIG. 2, the chambers 10 contain alternatingly only windings or partial windings of the primary side P or of the secondary side S. The illustrated nesting or interleaving of the windings, i.e. the alternating arrangement of windings of the primary side P and of the secondary side S in successive chambers 10, assures the desired close coupling between the primary side P and the secondary side S. The arrangement of the windings 3, 4 in approximately the center of the coil body 9 above partial winding 1b assures the desired close coupling between the windings 3, 4 with the other windings.
In an embodiment of the transformer shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 which was successfully tested in practice, the individual windings were all wound with the same diameter wire and contained the following numbers of turns:
______________________________________
Winding No. Number of Turns
______________________________________


1a 22

1b 22

1c 22

2a 30

2b 30

3 3

4 10

5 25

6 1

7a 11

7b 11

7c 11

8 16

______________________________________
The diameter of the wire of the windings 1-8 may be about 0.40 or 0.45 mm. Also, each winding may exist of two parallel shunted wires each of 0.3 mm diameter. The width of the six chambers 10--seen from the left to the right in FIG. 2--may be 0.95/1.95/1.75/1.95/0.95/2.75 mm and the thickness of the walls forming the chambers 0.65 mm.
It will be understood that the above description of the present invention is susceptible to various modifications, changes and adaptations, and the same are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalents of the appended claims.


TELEFUNKEN PALCOLOR HIFI 292 PIP "MILLENNIUM" CHASSIS 618 A-2 PIP (ICC5341) NS5000 Raster distortion correction circuitry Unit for a video display apparatus that includes a square-planar picture tube

A video display apparatus incorporates a picture tube, such as a square-planar picture tube, that includes a phosphor screen located on a faceplate having an aspherically curved geometry that produces a relatively flat surface contour. Deflection circuitry generates line and field scanning currents in respective line and field deflection windings to enable the electron beams of the picture tube to scan a raster on the phosphor screen. The electron beams are subject to a scanning error that results in raster distortion, such as side pincushion distortion. A parabola generator produces a parabolic modulation of the scanning of the electron beams to generally correct the raster distortion while retaining a residual error due to the aspherically curved geometry of the faceplate. A nonlinear waveshaping circuit modifies the parabolic modulation of the scanning current in accordance with the aspherically curved geometry to provide additional modulation of the electron beam scanning for correcting the residual error. The nonlinear waveshaping circuit includes a current source and a switched current divider that is responsive to a threshold level of the parabolic voltage developed by the parabola generator.



1. Video display apparatus with correction of raster distortion, comprising:
a picture tube having a phosphor screen located on a faceplate having an aspherically curved surface contour, with at least one of a minor and major axis exhibiting a curvature that changes from an edge of the faceplate to the center;
deflection means including horizontal and vertical deflection windings for generating respectively therein horizontal and vertical deflection currents to enable an electron beam of said picture tube to scan a raster on said phosphor screen;
a parabola generator coupled to said deflection means for generating a generally parabolically shaped signal that produces a parabolic modulation of the scanning of said electron beam to generally provide correction of a first raster distortion while leaving uncorrected a residual raster distortion due to the change in curvature of said faceplate from said edge to the center; and
means for nonlinearly modifying said (parabolic modulation) parabolically shaped signal as a function of said change in curvature of said faceplate to provide additional modulation of the scanning of said electron beam for correcting said residual raster distortion.
2. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said first raster distortion results in side pincushion raster distortion and wherein said faceplate has an aspherically curved geometry that results in areas of said faceplate near the top and bottom being of increased curvature relative to the curvature in areas near the center. 3. Apparatus according to claim 2 wherein said residual raster distortion comprises a barrel-like distortion of a raster display of a vertical line pattern in said areas near the top and bottom of said faceplate. 4. Apparatus according to claim 2 wherein said nonlinearly modifying means comprises a current source coupled to said parabola generator and a switched current divider that switches from a first conductive state to a second conductive state during that portion of a vertical trace interval when a raster is being scanned on said faceplate in said areas of increased curvature. 5. Apparatus according to claim 4 wherein said parabolically shaped signal is a generally parabolically shaped input voltage repeating at a vertical deflection rate and having both a DC component voltage and an AC parabolic component voltage and wherein said switched current divider comprises an impedance receiving a constant current from said current source for establishing a bias voltage level and switching means responsive to said bias voltage level and direct current coupled to said parabola generator for shunting a portion of said constant current when said input voltage goes beyond a threshold voltage level established in accordance with said bias voltage level to modify the waveshape of said input voltage in a manner that corrects said residual raster distortion. 6. A circuit for correcting a given error of electron beam positioning in a video display apparatus, comprising:
a deflection winding;
an output stage for generating current in said deflection winding to control said electron beam positioning;
a parabolic voltage generator for developing a generally parabolically shaped input voltage repeating at a deflection rate and having both a DC component voltage and an AC parabolic component voltage;
an amplifier for driving said output stage in accordance with said parabolically shaped input voltage to generally correct said given error while retaining a residual error of said electron beam positioning;
a current source;
an impedance receiving current from said current source for establishing a bias voltage level; and
switching means responsive to said bias voltage level and direct current coupled to said parabolically shaped input voltage for shunting a portion of the current from said current source when said input voltage goes beyond a threshold voltage level established in accordance with said bias voltage level to modify the waveshape of said input voltage in a manner that corrects said residual error.
7. A circuit according to claim 6 wherein said switching means is direct current coupled to an output terminal of said parabolic voltage generator, at which terminal said input voltage is developed, and which is direct current coupled to a terminal of said impedance, at which impedance terminal said bias voltage level is developed. 8. A circuit according to claim 7 wherein said switching means comprises a diode in which there flows the shunted portion of current from said current source. 9. A circuit according to claim 7 wherein the shunted portion of current from said current source establishes a modified parabola voltage at an output terminal of said switching means that is direct current coupled to the output terminal of said parabolic voltage generator, said modified parabola voltage having a waveform that generally follows the waveform of said input voltage when said switching means is in one conductive state and having a waveform of waveshape that is substantially different than that of said input voltage when said switching means is in another conductive state. 10. A circuit according to claim 9 including means for AC coupling said modified parabola voltage to said amplifier. 11. A circuit according to claim 10 including means for adjusting said bias voltage level to adjust the switching instants of said switching means and wherein a peak amplitude of said modified parabola voltage remains substantially unchanged for different adjustments of said bias voltage level. 12. A circuit according to claim 11 including an adjustable voltage divider coupled to said AC coupling means and direct current coupled to said amplifier for adjusting the amplitude of the AC coupled modified parabola voltage, and wherein the peak amplitude of the modified parabola voltage that is established at the output terminal of said switching means remains substantially unchanged for different adjustments of said voltage divider. 13. A circuit according to claim 9 wherein said input voltage includes an AC sawtooth component voltage repeating at said deflection rate and further including means for applying said sawtooth component voltage to said impedance to provide common-mode rejection of said sawtooth component voltage with respect to the shunted portion of current from said current source. 14. A circuit according to claim 9 wherein said switching means applies an additional voltage to said terminal of said impedance that is representative of the difference between said bias voltage level and said input voltage to control the amplitude of the shunted portion of current in accordance with said additional voltage. 15. A circuit according to claim 9 wherein said current source comprises a source of DC voltage coupled to a second impedance, and wherein said switching means applies an additional voltage to said terminal of the first mentioned impedance that is representative of a difference between said bias voltage level and said input voltage. 16. A circuit according to claim 15 wherein said DC voltage of said DC voltage source is substantially greater in magnitude than that of said additional voltage to prevent significant changes from occurring in the magnitude of said current source when said switching means changes conductive states. 17. A circuit according to claim 6 wherein said video display apparatus includes a picture tube having a phosphor screen located on a faceplate having an aspherically curved geometry that produces a relatively flat surface contour and wherein said residual error of electron beam positioning is produced in accordance with said aspherically curved geometry. 18. A circuit according to claim 17 wherein said given error is produced by side pincushion distortion and wherein said residual error produces a barrel-like distortion of a raster display of a vertical line pattern in regions near the top and bottom of said faceplate where the curvature of said faceplate is increased relative to the curvature in the center region. 19. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said nonlinearly modifying means produces a parabolic modulation when scanning raster lines near top and bottom of said raster that is different than when scanning raster lines near raster center for correcting said residual raster distortion due to the aspherically curved geometry of said faceplate.
Description:
This invention relates to electron beam positioning error correction circuitry in a video display apparatus.
New, flatter faceplate picture tubes, such as the RCA Corporation square-planar picture tubes, have aspherically curved faceplate contours. A tube of this type, having a complex curvature faceplate, is described in the following U.S. patent applications, herein incorporated by reference.
1. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 469,772, filed Feb. 25, 1983, by F. R. Ragland, Jr. entitled CATHODE-RAY TUBE HAVING AN IMPROVED SHADOW MASK CONTOUR.
2. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 469,774, filed Feb. 25, 1983 by F. R. Ragland, Jr. entitled CATHODE-RAY TUBE HAVING A FACEPLATE PANEL WITH A SUBSTANTIALLY PLANAR PERIPHARY.
3. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 469,775, filed Feb. 25, 1983, by R. J. D'Amato et al., entitled CATHODE-RAY TUBE HAVING DIFFERENT CURVATURE ALONG MAJOR AND MINOR AXES.
4. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 529,644, filed Sept. 6, 1983, by R. J. D'Amato et al., entitled CATHODE-RAY TUBE HAVING A FACEPLATE PANEL WITH AN ESSENTIALLY PLANAR SCREEN PERIPHERY.
In one form of flatter faceplate picture tube, as typified by the RCA 110° COTY-SP, square-planar, 27 V, color television picture tube, A68ACC10X, the formula for the tube faceplate sagittal height, z, in millimeters, with reference to the center of the faceplate is given by: Z=A 1 X 2 +A 2 X 4 +A 3 Y 2 +A 4 X 2 Y 2 +A 5 X 4 Y 2 +A 6 Y 4 +A 7 X 2 Y 4 +A 8 X 4 Y 4 ,
where X and Y are the distance coordinates, in millimeters, from the faceplate center along the major and minor axes, respectively, and where: A 1 =-0.236424229×10 -4 A 2 =-0.363538575×10 -8 A 3 =-0.422441063×10 -3 A 4 =-0.213537355×10 -8 A 5 =+0.883912220×10 -13 A 6 =-0.100020398×10 -9 A 7 =+0.117915353×10 -14 A 8 =+0.527722295×10 -21
The picture tube faceplate defined by this formula has a relatively shallow curvature near the center of the faceplate, which increases near the edges along paths parallel to both the major and minor axes of the tube. The overall result is a faceplate of relatively flat appearance and with planar edges, namely, with points along the top, bottom, right and left edges located substantially in a common plane.
In general, the raster scanned on the phosphor screen of a picture tube may exhibit an east-west or side pincushion raster distortion. This distortion may be substantially corrected by a side pincushion correction circuit that produces a parabolic amplitude modulation of the horizontal deflection current. The required vertical rate parabola voltage may be obtained from the vertical deflection circuit by integration of the vertical sawtooth current.
When using such a conventional circuit for raster correction in a picture tube, such as a square-planar picture tube that has an aspherically curved faceplate, a small but often objectionable raster distortion may remain at the top and bottom of the display, as illustrated by the solid vertical lines of a raster R display R in FIG. 1. Due to the aspherically curved geometry of the faceplate, the vertical line bend away from the vertical direction near the top and bottom of the raster display, where the curvature of the faceplate increases. The overall appearance of the vertical lines in FIG. 1 is slightly barrel-shaped.
In accordance with an aspect of the invention, a video display apparatus includes a picture tube having a phosphor screen located on a faceplate having an aspherically curved geometry. Correction circuitry is provided that compensates for raster distortion or electron beam positioning errors, such as pincushion or convergence distortions. The correction circuitry includes a parabola generator coupled to deflection circuitry for producing a parabolic modulation of the scanning of the electron beam. The modulation generally provides correction of the raster distortion or electron beam positioning error, while retaining a residual error due to the aspherically curved geometry of the faceplate. The modulation is nonlinearly modified in accordance with the aspherically curved geometry to provide additional modulation of the scanning of the electron beam for correcting the residual error.
In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a particularly advantageous arrangement of correction circuitry smoothly straightens the bent vertical lines near the top and bottom of the raster display illustrated in FIG. 1.
The parabola generator of the correction circuit arrangement produces a generally parabolically shaped input voltage repeating at a deflection rate. An amplifier drives an output stage that generates current in a deflection winding to control the electron beam landing position. The amplifier is responsive to the output of the parabola generator for driving the output stage in accordance with the parabolically shaped input voltage to generally correct electron beam landing error, while retaining a residual error. A current source with a switched current dividing network is responsive to a threshold level of the parabolically shaped input voltage for supplying to the amplifier a portion of the current from the current source when the input voltage exceeds the threshold level to correct the residual error.
FIG. 1 illustrates vertical lines of a raster display scanned on the screen of a square-planar picture tube;
FIG. 2 illustrates in block diagram form raster scanning circuitry used in conjunction with raster scanning on the aspherically curved faceplate of a square-planar picture tube, shown schematically in FIG. 2 from a side elevation view, in partial breakaway;
FIG. 3 illustrates detailed embodiments of the horizontal and vertical deflection circuits of FIG. 2, including circuitry embodying the invention that corrects for the residual side pincushion distortion illustrated in FIG. 1;
FIG. 4 illustrates a detailed embodiment of a portion of the circuit of FIG. 3; and
FIG. 5 illustrates waveforms useful in explaining operation of the circuits of FIGS. 3 and 4.
In FIG. 1, there is illustrated vertical lines of a raster display R that is generated on the phosphor screen of a faceplate 30 of a square-planar picture tube SP of FIG. 2. Horizontal and vertical deflection circuits 20 and 40 of FIG. 2 generate horizontal and vertical deflection currents in horizontal and vertical deflection windings L H and L V , respectively. The horizontal and vertical deflection currents deflect electron beams 18 in square-planar picture tube SP to produce raster display R on faceplate 30.
Square-planar picture tube SP incorporates a glass envelope 11 comprising a generally rectangular faceplate panel 19 and a tubular neck 14 connected by a funnel 16. Panel 19 comprises viewing faceplate 30 and a peripheral flange or side wall 12, which is sealed to funnel 16 by a glass frit 17. A generally rectangular 3-color cathodoluminescent phosphor screen 15 is carried by the inner surface of faceplate 30. The screen may be a line screen, with the phosphor lines extending substantially parallel to the minor or vertical axis Y--Y of the tube. Alternatively, the screen may be a dot screen. A multi-aperture color selection electrode or shadow mask 13 is removably mounted within panel 19 in predetermined spaced relation to screen 15. An electron gun 10, shown schematically by dashed lines in FIG. 2, is centrally mounted within neck 14 to generate and accelerate the three electron beams 18 along convergent paths through mask 13 to screen 15.
The line and field deflection currents in line and field deflection windings L H and L V , respectively, subject the three electron beams 18 to vertical and horizontal magnetic flux that scans the beams horizontally in the direction of the major or horizontal axis X--X and vertically in the direction of the minor axis Y--Y, in a rectangular raster pattern over screen 15. The longitudinal axis of picture tube SP is labeled Z--Z in FIG. 2.
Faceplate 30 of square-planar color picture tube SP is relatively flat. The curvature of the faceplate is complex and may be approximated in accordance with the polynominal expression given above. In the field scanning direction, or as the electron beams are scanned from top edge to bottom edge, vertically, the curvature of the faceplate decreases from top edge to center and then increases again to the bottom edge. A similar situation holds in the line scanning direction.
Assume that horizontal and vertical deflection circuits 20 and 40 of FIG. 2 correct for distortions such as S-distortion, north-south and gullwing distortion. Furthermore, assume that horizontal deflection circuit 20 generally corrects for side pincushion distortion by parabolically modulating the amplitude of the horizontal deflection current. The display of a vertical line pattern on faceplate 30 by means of raster line scanning produces a raster display such as illustrated in solid-line in FIG. 1. The generally vertical lines exhibit a residual distortion at the top and bottom of the raster which, due to the aspherically curved geometry of faceplate 30, causes the vertical raster lines to be bent inward toward the center in a barrel-like manner.
In accordance with a feature of the invention, horizontal deflection circuit 20 nonlinearly modifies the parabolic modulation of the horizontal deflection current to straighten the vertical lines at the top and bottom of the raster, as illustrated by the dashed-line, straight line segments of FIG. 1.
FIG. 3 illustrates detailed embodiments of vertical deflection circuit 40 and horizontal deflection circuit 20 of FIG. 2 that include nonlinear waveshaping circuitry in accordance with an aspect of the invention. In horizontal deflection circuit 20 of FIG. 3, a B+ voltage is applied to the primary winding W p of a flyback transformer T1 via a small valued resistor 21. A capacitor 22 provides filtering. Primary winding W p is coupled to a horizontal output stage 70 of horizontal deflection circuit 20. Horizontal output stage 70 includes a horizontal oscillator and driver 25, a horizontal output transistor Q1, a first retrace capacitor C R1 coupled across transistor Q1, a damper diode D2, a second retrace capacitor C R2 coupled across diode D2 and the series arrangement of a linearity inductor 26, and S-shaping capacitor C s , deflection winding L H of FIG. 2, and a resonant circuit 27, comprising a capacitor C1 in parallel with the inductance of a tapped winding W1 of a transformer T2. Deflection winding L H is coupled to the tap terminal of winding W1.
Resonant circuit 27 is tuned to produce approximately two cycles of oscillation during the horizontal trace interval for introducing an oscillatory current component into horizontal deflection current i H that provides dynamic S-correction of the raster scanned on faceplate 30 of square-planar picture tube SP of FIG. 1. The function of dynamic S-correction, resonant circuit 27 is more fully described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,563,618, by P. E. Haferl, issued Jan. 7, 1986, entitled S-CORRECTED DEFLECTION CIRCUIT.
To provide side pincushion correction, the amplitude of horizontal deflection current i H is modulated at a vertical rate by a side pincushion correction modulator circuit 30 that drives horizontal output circuit 70. Side pincushion correction circuit 30 includes a damper diode D3 with a grounded anode and a cathode coupled to the anode of damper diode D2, a retrace capacitor C R3 coupled across diode D3, a modulator choke inductor L m coupled to the junction of retrace capacitors C R2 and C R3 , and a modulator control circuit 60 coupled to choke L m .
Modulator control circuit 60 modulates at a vertical rate the modulator current i m in choke L m , to concurrently modulate the retrace pulse voltage V Rm developed across modulator retrace capacitor C R3 . The modulation of retrace pulse voltage V Rm produces a concurrent but opposite sense modulation of deflection retrace pulse voltage V Rd across deflection retrace capacitor C R2 . The vertical rate modulation of deflection retrace pulse voltage V Rd produces the required vertical rate modulation of horizontal deflection current i H that provides side pincushion correction.
The opposing sense modulation of retrace pulse voltages V Rd and V Rm produces an unmodulated retrace pulse voltage V R at the collector of horizontal output transistor Q1. Retrace pulse voltage V R is applied to the primary winding W p of flyback transformer T1 for generating an unmodulated retrace pulse voltage V RH at a terminal A of a secondary winding W s . An unmodulated retrace pulse voltage is also generated in a high voltage winding W HV for developing an ultor accelerating potential at a terminal U of a high voltage generating circuit 23.
FIG. 3 also illustrates a detailed embodiment of vertical deflection circuit 40 of FIG. 2. Vertical deflection circuit 40 includes a vertical deflection amplifier U1 coupled to vertical deflection winding L V of FIG. 2 for generating a vertical deflection current i V that deflects the electron beams in picture tube SP of FIG. 2 in the vertical direction. Vertical deflection winding L V is coupled to a north-south and gullwing distortion correction circuit 34 for modulating vertical deflection current i V in a manner that corrects both north-south pincushion distortion and gullwing distortion of the raster when scanning raster lines on square-planar picture tube SP of FIG. 2. A description of the operation of north-south pincushion and gullwing correction circuit 34 may be found in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 719,227, filed Apr. 2, 1985, by P. E. Haferl entitled NORTH-SOUTH PINCUSHION CORRECTED DEFLECTION CIRCUIT, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,668,897 and in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 733,661, filed May 10, 1985, by P. E. Haferl et al, entitled GULLWING DISTORTION CORRECTED DEFLECTION CIRCUITRY FOR A SQUARE-PLANAR PICTURE TUBE, both herein incorporated by reference.
Vertical deflection current i V , after passing through correction circuit 34, flows through a coupling or vertical S-shaping capacitor C V and a current sampling resistor R s . Coupling capacitor C V intergrates vertical deflection current i V to develop across the capacitor between terminals 35 and 36 an AC parabola voltage, of almost ideal waveshape, that repeats at the vertical deflection rate. The voltage across capacitor C V comprises the AC parabola voltage superimposed upon a DC level established by vertical deflection amplifier U1. The voltage V sV developed across current sampling resistor R s is illustrated in FIG. 5a and comprises an AC, S-shaped, sawtooth voltage repeating at the vertical deflection rate. The voltage V1 developed at terminal 35 is illustrated in FIG. 5b and equals the sum of the voltages developed across capacitor C V and resistor R s . Thus, the AC component of voltage V1 during the vertical trace interval t 3 -t 7 of FIG. 5b is a generally parabolically shaped voltage that is skewed downward by the relatively small sawtooth voltage component derived from sampling resistor R s .
The voltages at terminals 35 and 36 are applied to vertical deflection amplifier U1 to provide DC and AC feeback, respectively, to the amplifier. The vertical rate voltages V1 and V sV , the horizontal rate retrace pulse voltage V RH and a voltage V ds developed across winding W2 of transformer T2 are coupled to correction circuit 34 to provide deflection synchronization information and to provide waveform information that produces the required waveshaping and modulation of vertical deflection current i v , as described in the aforementioned U.S. patent applications.
Vertical deflection circuit 40 may be considered as a low impedance voltage source 48 that generates parabola voltage V1 at output terminal 35 of the source.
Vertical parabola voltage V1 is nonlinearly waveshaped by a nonlinear network 50 and is then applied via a DC blocking capacitor C2 and a parabola amplitude adjusting potentiometer R a to the noninverting input terminal of an amplifier U2 of side pincushion control circuit 60. Vertical sawtooth voltage V sV is applied to the inverting input terminal of amplifier U2 via the wiper arm of a trapeze adjusting potentiometer R t and a resistor 31. The DC level at the inverting input terminal is controlled by a width adjusting potentiometer 33 that couples a +25 V source to the inverting input terminal via a resistor 32 and the wiper arm of potentiometer 33. The output of amplifier U2 is coupled to an inverting driver stage U3 that applies a modulation voltage V m to modulator choke inductor L m .
Side pincushion control circuit 60 is operated in the switched mode at the horizontal rate. A horizontal sawtooth voltage generator 29, synchronized by horizontal retrace pulse voltage V RH , applies a horizontal rate sawtooth voltage V sH to the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2 via a resistor R g . Resistor R g represents the effective source impedance of sawtooth voltage generator 29. The output of amplifier U2 is a pulse width modulated, horizontal rate voltage having a duty cycle that varies at a vertical rate. Modulation voltage V m therefore is also a pulse width modulated, horizontal rate voltage having a duty cycle that varies at a vertical rate. This enables the drive provided by side pincushion modulator circuit 30 to be varied in a manner that corrects side pincushion distortion.
Side pincushion modulator circuit 30 operates in a manner similar to that described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 651,301, filed Sept. 17, 1984, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,634,937 by P. E. Haferl, entitled EAST-WEST CORRECTION CIRCUIT. Other side pincushion correction circuits, such as switched mode diodc modulator circuits, may be used to drive horizontal output stage 70.
In accordance with an aspect of the invention, nonlinear waveshaping network 50 is interposed between terminal 35 and the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2 of side pincushion control circuit 60. Nonlinear network 50 modifies the waveshape of parabola voltage V1 at terminal 35 to generate a modified parabola voltage V2 at a terminal 37, as illustrated by the solid-line waveform of voltage V2 in FIG. 5f. Shaped parabola voltage V2 is then applied to the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2 via AC coupling capacitor C2 and potentiometer R a . The additional waveshaping provided by nonlinear network 50 corrects the residual side pincushion error that would otherwise exist when scanning a raster on the phosphor screen of a square-planar picture tube.
Nonlinear waveshaping network 50 comprises a constant current source CS in series with a potentiometer R2 that is coupled to the wiper arm of trapeze adjusting potentiometer R t . A diode D1, functioning as a unidirectional switch, is coupled between the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 and terminal 37, with the cathode of diode D1 being coupled to terminal 37.
In operation, constant current source CS generates an almost ideal constant current i 0 , illustrated in FIG. 5d, that does not significantly change in value throughout the entire vertical deflection interval t 3 -t 8 . Diode D1 is reverse biased by voltage V2 during the interval t b of FIG. 5. During this interval, all of current i 0 that flows into end terminal 38 of potentiometer R2 flows out of the other end terminal 39, as illustrated in FIG. 5c by the current i 3 during the interval t b . Current i 3 flows in that portion R2b of potentiometer R2 between intermediate wiper arm terminal 41 and end terminal 39 coupled to the wiper arm of potentiometer R t . The solid-line waveform of FIG. 5c also illustrates the voltage V3 developed by current i 3 in resistance R2b.
When diode D1 is nonconductive, during the interval t b of FIG. 5, constant current source CS advantageously establishes an adjustable DC bias voltage level V b at intermediate wiper arm terminal 41, as illustrated by the dotted-line waveform of FIG. 5c. Voltage V b equals the constant voltage level V 0 that is established for voltage V3 by constant current source CS, summed with the vertical sawtooth voltage developed at the wiper arm of trapeze adjusting potentiometer R t . Illustratively, voltage level V 0 is shown in FIG. 5c at a level established by the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 when the wiper arm is in a centered position.
When diode D1 is nonconductive, voltage V1 is divided by a voltage divider (R1, R a , R b , R g ) coupled between terminal 35 and the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2 for developing voltage V2 at terminal 37, which terminal is an intermediate point of the voltage divider. As illustrated in FIGS. 5b and 5f, voltages V1 and V2 exhibit substantially the same waveshape during the interval t b .
During the second half of vertical trace, after the center of trace instant t 5 , voltages V1 and V2 decrease in amplitude. Near time t 6 , voltage V1 has decreased to a threshold voltage level V' al and voltage V2 has decreased to a threshold voltage level V a1 . The decreased voltage V2 at terminal 37 near time t 6 or time t 1 , enables diode D1 of nonlinear waveshaping circuit 50 to begin conducting, thereby coupling together terminals 37 and 41.
Diode D1 continues to conduct throughout the interval t a of FIG. 5. During this interval, voltages V1 and V2 are below the threshold levels V' a2 and V a2 , respectively. At the end of the interval t a , near time t 9 or time t 4 , voltages V1 and V2 have increased sufficiently to reestablish at terminal 41 the bias voltage level V b of FIG. 5c that forces diode D1 to become nonconductive.
During the interval t a , when diode D1 is conductive, a portion of constant current i O of FIG. 5d, that flows in the upper resistance portion R2a of potentiometer R2, is shunted away from resistance R2b via the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 and diode D1. The shunt current i c in diode D1 is illustrated in FIG. 5e during the interval t 1 -t 4 or t 6 -t 9 . Current i c substracts from constant current i 0 when diode D1 is conductive to reduce the amplitude of current i 3 in resistance R2b by the amount of current shunted. As illustrated in FIG. 5c, current i 3 , during the interval t a , has the same waveshape as current i c of FIG. 5e, but inverted in phase.
The waveshape of current i c is determined in accordance with the waveshape of the parabolic component of voltage V1 that is applied to the voltage divider (R1, R2b) formed whendiode D1 is conductive. The amplitude of current i c is related to the difference in value between the bias voltage level V b and the parabolic voltage V1.
Correction current i c , flowing into terminal 37, modifies the waveshape of voltage V2 during the interval t a to correct the residual side pincushion error that would otherwise exist in raster display R of FIG. 1. Correction current i c flows mainly in resistor R1 to provide an additional voltage drop between terminals 37 and 35 that produces a flatter slope to the sides of parabola voltage V2 during the conduction interval t a of diode D1.
The solid-line waveform of FIG. 5f during the interval t a illustrates voltage V2 with diode D1 conducting. The dashed-line waveform illustrates the waveshape that voltage V2 would have assumed had diode D1 remained nonconductive during the interval t a . Comparing the solid-line waveform with the dashed-line waveform in FIG. 5f, one notes that the presence of nonlinear network 50 waveshapes parabola voltage V2 during the intervals t 3 -t 4 and t 6 -t 7 , when the top and bottom of the raster are being scanned.
The flattening of parabola voltage V2 occurs when the raster lines between lines L3 and L4 and between lines L6 and L7 of FIG. 1 are being scanned. This flattening produces less modulation of the amplitude of deflection current i H when scanning the top and bottom raster lines. The result of the nonlinear waveshaping is the straightening of the bent vertical line segments of raster display R of FIG. 1 to correct the residual side pincushion error caused by the increased curvature of the faceplate of a square-planar picture tube in the top and bottom regions of the faceplate.
FIG. 4 illustrates a more detailed embodiment of a portion of the circuitry of FIG. 3 that includes nonlinear network 50. Items in FIGS. 3 and 4 similarly identified perform similar functions or represent similar quantities.
Inverting driver stage U3 comprises a switching transistor Q2 driven at its base by amplifier U2 and having its collector coupled to choke inductor L m and its emitter coupled to ground. During those intervals within each horizontal deflection cycle that transistor Q2 is cutoff, modulator current i m flows to the B+ supply via a flywheel diode D4. DC biasing for transistor Q2 is established by voltage dividing resistors 42 and 43. To provide stabilized operation of driver transistor Q2, negative feedback from the collector of the transistor to the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2 is provided via a resistor 44.
Horizontal sawtooth generator 29 comprises an RC network including a resistor 45 coupled to flyback transformer terminal A and a capacitor 46 coupled to the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2. DC biasing of the noninverting input terminal is provided by resistor R b . Horizontal retrace pulse voltage V RH is integrated by the RC network to develop the horizontal sawtooth voltage V sH that produces the horizontal rate switching of transistor Q2. The duty cycle of the horizontal rate switching is modulated by means of the vertical rate modulation of the AC-zero level of voltage V sH .
In FIG. 4, constant current source CS comprises a DC voltage source of relatively large magnitude, such as the 140 volt, B+ voltage source, coupled to a resistor R3 of relatively large value, such as 180 kilohm. The amplitude of constant current i 0 is mainly determined by the value of the B+ voltage divided by the sum of the values of resistors R3 and R2. Current i 0 establishes an adjustable bias voltage level V b at the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 that maintains diode D1 nonconductive during the interval t b of FIG. 5 when parabola voltage V1 is sufficiently large in amplitude to keep the diode reverse biased. During the remaining interval t a , parabola voltage V1 is sufficiently small in amplitude to enable diode D1 to shunt some of current i 0 away from resistance portion R2b of potentiometer R2 to provide the correction current i c that waveshapes parabola voltage V2.
Advantageously, diode D1 is DC coupled to parabola voltage source 48 via resistor R1, with the cathode of diode D1 being coupled on the DC side (with respect to parabola voltage V1) of coupling capacitor C2. By means of the DC connection of diode D1 to parabola voltage source 48, the diode switching instants t 4 and T 6 may be adjusted by potentiometer R2 independently of the adjustment of east-west parabola amplitude potentiometer R a . When potentiometer R a is adjusted for the desired parabola amplitude, the AC-zero level of the parabola voltage applied to the noninverting input terminal of amplifier U2 also varies. This variation of the AC-zero level has little or no effect on the switching of diode D1.
For example, assume amplitude potentiometer R a is adjusted to provide the proper amount of side pincushion correction when the central raster lines are being scanned between raster line L4 and raster line L6 of FIG. 1 during the interval t 4 -t 6 of FIG. 5. Potentiometer R2 may then be adjusted to establish a bias voltage level V b that enables diode D1 to switch conductive states near times t 4 and t 6 . The switching of diode D1 near times t 4 and t 6 provides the required additional waveshaping of voltage V2 that corrects the residual side pincushion error in the top and bottom regions of raster display R.
The instants when diode D1 switches conductive states are controlled by the DC bias level V b established by potentiometer R2 rather than by amplitude potentiometer R a . The adjustment of potentiometer R2 has no significant effect on the previous amplitude adjustment provided by potentiometer R a .
When the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 is moved towards end terminal 39, the conduction interval t a of diode D1 decreases and the cutof interval t b increases. The location of raster lines L4 and L6 where nonlinear waveshaping begins moves away from center raster line L5 towards top and bottom raster lines L3 and L7, respectively. The peak downward excursion of voltage V2, that occurs near the beginning of retrace near times t 2 and t 7 , also moves downward toward the dashed-line level that represents the peak downward excursion when diode D1 is cutoff for the entire vertical deflection interval t 2 -t 7 .
The amount of nonlinear waveshaping of parabola voltage V2 may be defined as the voltage difference between the dashed and solid-line waveforms V2 of FIG. 5f at times t 3 and t 7 , the start and end of vertical trace, respectively. This voltage difference relative to the dashed-line waveform V2 represents the amount of correction resulting on the raster display of FIG. 1.
When the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 is moved toward end terminal 38, the amount of nonlinear waveshaping increases until the conduction interval t a of diode D1 equals the nonconduction interval t b . As the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 is moved further toward end terminal 38, the amount of waveshaping begins to decrease and reaches zero when bias voltage level V b is set at a sufficiently high level to enable diode D1 to conduct for the entire vertical deflection interval.
The amplitude of current i c changes when potentiometer R2 is adjusted. However, the peak amplitude that parabola voltage V2 attains remains substantially the same at all levels of adjustment because correction current i c of FIGS. 3 and 4 flows mainly in resistor R1 and does not add any significant charge to AC coupling capacitor C2. No significant portion of current i c flows in capacitor C2 because of the long time constant associated with capacitor C2 and resistors R a , R b , R g . Current i c causes a very small increase of the average DC voltage at terminal 37, not illustrated in waveform FIG. 5. This increase amounts to approximately 75 millivolt, which is 1/4 the voltage difference between the dashed and solid-line waveforms of voltage V2 in FIG. 5f, at times t 3 and t 7 .
When diode D1 becomes conductive, parabola voltage source 48 becomes DC coupled to current source CS. At the same time an additional load impedance becomes coupled to current source CS derived from the voltage divider (R1, R a , R b , R g ). Because of the DC connection provided by diode D1 between the wiper arm of potentiometer R2 and parabola voltage source 48, the additional voltage that is coupled in-circuit with current source CS during the interval t a of FIG. 5 is relatively small. The additional voltage, ΔV3, equals the voltage difference between the constant voltage level V 0 of FIG. 5c and the voltage V3 developed across resistance R2b.
The peak-to-peak amplitude of voltage ΔV3 is relatively small, approximately one volt peak-to-peak for the values given in FIG. 4. Because the peak-to-peak amplitude ΔV3 is much smaller than the B+ voltage of constant current source CS, the shunt current i c that source CS supplies when diode D1 is conductive is also small relative to current i 0 and has substantially no effect on the amplitude of the constant current. For the values given in FIG. 4, the amplitude of current i 0 changes less than one percent during the conduction interval t a shown in FIG. 5.
End terminal 39 of potentiometer R2 may be advantageously coupled to trapeze adjusting potentiometer R t rather than to ground. This connection enables nonlinear network 50 to provide a common-mode rejection of the sawtooth voltage component of parabola voltage V1. Thus, diode D1 nonlinearly waveshapes only the parabolic component of voltage V1 and not the sawtooth component. The common-mode rejection of the waveshaping of the sawtooth component of voltage V1 may be noted from the waveforms of FIGS. 5c and 5e, which are symmetrical about the center of trace instant t 5 .
Nonlinear waveshaping network 50 advantageously produces gradual changes in the slope of parabola voltage V2 at the switching instants of diode D1 that smoothly straightens the bent segments of the vertical lines of raster display R in FIG. 1, without introducing wiggly line excursions of the vertical line pattern near raster lines L4 and L6.
Nonlinear network 50 operates as a current divider to divide current i 0 into current i 3 and current i c during conduction of diode D1. Thus, the change in the forward voltage drop of diode D1, produced by variations in ambient temperature, has little influence on the waveshaping of the parabola voltage.



TELEFUNKEN PALCOLOR HIFI 292 PIP "MILLENNIUM" CHASSIS 618 A-2 PIP (ICC5341) Television receiver comprising a teletext videeotext decoding circuit and a page number memory:

A television receiver which is suitable for displaying teletext pages comprises a control system including a microcomputer. The microcomputer is coupled to a volatile memory which comprises a plurality of page number registers. A page number can be temporarily stored in each of these registers. With the aid of a keyboard the user makes known which page numbers he wants to have stored in the different registers and the stored page numbers represent a first series of pages. One single read key (RCL) is provided for the display of such a page. Each time this key is depressed once, a different page belonging to the first series appears on the picture screen. The sequence in which the pages appear is the same as the sequence in which the user has keyed-in the relevant page numbers. This sequence can be interrupted by the occurrence of a preselected operating instruction in response to which a number of teletext pages not associated with said first series can be displayed on the picture screen. Thereafter, the display of the teletext pages of the first series can be continued.


1. A television receiver comprising:
a control system for generating in response to external manipulations control instructions including teletext page numbers of teletext pages to be displayed on said television receiver;
a teletext-decoder circuit having a page number input for receiving from said control system page numbers of teletext pages to be displayed and having a picture output applying the picture signal of the teletext page to be displayed;
a picture screen coupled to display the picture signal from the picture signal output of the teletext decoder circuit, said picture screen displaying a teletext page which is identified by an associated page number;
page number storage means for storing a plurality of page number; and
a programmable control circuit coupled to the page number storage means and to the control system for receiving the control instructions, and to said page number input of the teletext decoder circuit to apply teletext page numbers thereto, the control circuit being programmed for carrying out the steps of:
storing in the page number storage means a first series of preselected teletext page numbers selected by a user in the order in which the corresponding teletext pages are desired for display;
successively applying the teletext page numbers of said first series to the teletext-decoder in response to successive occurrences of a selected first control instruction for successively displaying the teletext pages corresponding to the teletext page numbers successively applied to the teletext-decoder;
interrupting the successive application of teletext page numbers of said first series to the teletext-decoder in response to the occurrence of a selected further control instruction;
storing intermediate teletext page numbers in the order in which the corresponding teletext pages are desired for display;
successively applying the intermediate teletext page number to the teletext-decoder in response to successive further occurrences of the selected control instruction; and
continuing the successive application of the remainder teletext page numbers of said first series to the teletext decoder after all the intermediate teletext page numbers have been applied thereto.
2. A television receiver as claimed in claim 1, in which the storage means comprises N registers, each register storing a teletext page number, whereby registers storing teletext page numbers selected by the user are defined to be occupied registers and whereby the remaining registers are defined to be non-occupied registers, the control circuit is further programmed for:
making a register non-occupied in response to each occurrence of the selected first control instruction,
generating a sequence of further page numbers S+1, S+2, S+3, . . . in which S represents the last teletext page number of the first sequence; and
storing the teletext page numbers S+1, S+2, . . . S+(N-M) in the respective non-occupied registers, where M is the actual number of occupied register.
Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
(1) Field of the Invention
The invention relates to a television receiver of a type comprising a teletext decoding circuit and a storage means (page number memory) in which the page numbers associated with a plurality of teletext pages can be stored.
(2) Description of the Prior Art
Such a television receiver has several operating modes, more specifically a program-mode and a teletext mode. In the program mode the video signal transmitted by a transmitter is applied through a video channel to a picture screen for displaying the television program. In the teletext mode said video signal is applied through a teletext decoder circuit to the picture screen for displaying the teletext associated with the program. The television itself can be partly or wholly suppressed.
The operating mode is determined by the viewer, (user). To enable the viewer to inform the receiver about his wishes, the receiver includes a control system comprising external components which can be manipulated by the viewer. More specifically, this control system has a control panel with control keys, each having a specific control function. This function is indicated by a sign applied on, over or under the relevant control key. Thus, there are for example a volume control key, a luminance key, a teletext key, a mixed-mode key, a program key and a plurality fo figure keys etc. These last-mentioned keys are characterized in that the associated signs are numerals. If the receiver is in the program mode, the viewer can inform the receiver with the aid of the figure keys which program or channel is wanted. After the teletext or the mixed-mode key has been operated the set is in the teletext mode with a partly or wholly suppressed television program and the viewer keys-in the page number of the desired teletext page, using the same above mentioned keys.
Operation (or manupulating) of one or more of the keys on the control panel generally results in the generation of a control instruction by the control system. Such control instruction may include the page numbers of a desired teletext page. All these instructions are received by a control circuit which interprets these instructions and gives instructions to the different circuits to be controlled, including the teletext decoder circuit. More specifically, the teletext decoder receives a page number in response to which the required teletext page is captured, stored in a page memory and thereafther displayed on the picture screen by a character generator.
As is known a teletext index page is first displayed on the picture screen after a teletext key or the mixed-mode key has been operated. By selecting a desired page from this index and keying-in the associated page number with the aid of the numeric keys this teletext page is captured by the teletext decoder circuit and displayed thereafter.
If thereafter the display is required of a page associated with a different subject, the index page must usually again be consulted to find the page number of the relevant page. It should be borne in mind that each time the page number of a desired page is keyed-in it takes a certain period of time before the relevant page is displayed on the screen. It is therefore justified to state that such a television receiver is far from user-friendly. To improve this, it is proposed on page 527 of reference 1 to provide the receiver with a storage means which is coupled to the control circuit and in which a plurality of page numbers can be stored. This storage means will be referred to as the page number memory hereinafter.
By operating the control circuit, the user can store a first series of page numbers in a sequence in which he wants them to be displayed, in the page number memory. To enable the display in the desired sequence of these preselected teletext pages, the control panel has a key which will be called the read key hereinafter. Each time this key is operated, the control circuit receives an accurately defined operating instruction and a subsequent page number of the first series is read from the page number memory and applied to the teletext decoder circuit. In this way the teletext pages of the first series are sequentially displayed on the picture screen.
Thus, for this television receiver it is possible to select all those pages from an index page the viewer is interested in. The page corresponding numbers can be stored in the page number memory in the sequence in which the display of these pages is desired. Thereafter, they can be caused to appear in the desired sequence, one after the other, by pushing the read key once for every page.
It should be noted, that, after the read key has been operated, it also takes a certain time before the new page appears on the picture screen. However, by constructing the teletext decoder circuit in the way described in reference 1 or 2, a new page can be displayed immediately after pushing the read key. It is possible to couple to the teletext decoder circuit detailed in said reference a page memory having a capacity that no less than four pages can be stored therein simultaneously. All this is then organised such that this page memory contains the page actually displayed on the picture screen and also the three pages of the first series.
It should also be noted that the page number memory may be constituted by a non-volatile memory, so that the same series of teletext pages are permanently available. It is alternatively possible to use a volatile memory for this purpose, optionally in combination with a non-volatile page number memory.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The invention has for its object to further improve the convenience of use of a television receiver of the type defined in the foregoing, having a volatile page number memory. According to the invention, the control circuit performs the following additional steps:
interrupting the sequential display of the teletext pages of the series for the benefit of the sequential display of a number of further teletext pages which do not belong to the first series, whose associated page numbers are generated by means of the control system; and,
continuing the display of the teletext pages of the first series in response to a further operation of the read key, after all the further teletext pages have been displayed on the screen.
The properties of the television receiver thus obtained will no doubt be appreciated when the following is considered. The contents of the first series of pages whose page numbers are stored in the page number memory are not known previously. When those pages are displayed, it may happen that a given page is itself an index page (denoted sub-index page in the sequel) or that it contains a reference to pages in which additional information on the same subject is contained. The viewer can now select from such sub-index page a further series of pages, generate the associated page numbers with the aid of the control system and insert the display of these pages between the sub-index page and the subsequent page of the first series. If the control circuit were not implemented in such a way that the above-defined steps can be performed, then these further pages could not be displayed until all the pages of this first series have been displayed on the picture screen.
REFERENCES
1. Enhanced UK teletext moves towards still pictures; J. P.Chambers: IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, Vol. Ce-26, Aug. 1980, pages 527-532.
2. Computer controlled teletext; J. R.Kinghorn; Electronic Components and Applications, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1984, pages 15-29.
3. Bipolar IC's for video equipment; Philips Data Handbook Integrated Circuits Part 2, Jan. 1983.
4. IC's for digital systems in radio, audio and video equipment; Philips Data Handbook Integrated Circuits, Part 3, Sept. 1982.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
FIG. 1 shows the general structure of a television receiver comprising a teletext decoder circuit and
FIGS. 2 to 10 shows diagrams to explain the operation of this television receiver.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
General Structures of the Television Receiver
FIG. 1 shows schematically the general structure of a colour television receiver. It has an antenna input 1 connected to an antenna 2, which receives a video signal modulated on a high-frequency carrier and processed in a plurality of processing circuits. More specifically, the video signal is applied to a tuning circuit 3 (tuner or channel selector) This tuning circuit receives a band selection voltage V B to enable tuning of the receiver to a frequency within one of the frequency bands VHF1, VHF2, UHF etc. In addition, the tuning circuit receives a tuning voltage V T for tuning the receiver to the desired frequency within the selected frequency band.
This tuning circuit 3 produces an oscillator signal having frequency f OSC and also an intermediate-frequency signal IF. The last-mentioned signal is applied to an intermediate-frequency amplifying and demodulating circuit 4 which produces a base band composite video signal CVBS. For this circuit 4 reference could be made to Philips IC TDA 2540, described in Reference 3.
The signal CVBS thus obtained is further applied to a colour decoder circuit 5, which produces the three primary colour signals R, G and B, which are applied by an amplifier circuit 6 to a picture tube 7 for displaying television programs on the picture screen 8. In the colour decoding circuit 5 colour saturation, contrast and luminance are influenced by means of control signals. In addition, the colour decoder circuit receives an additional set of primary colour signals R', G' and B', and also a switching signal BLK (Blanking) with which the primary colour signals R, G and B can be suppressed. For this circuit 5 a Philips integrated circuit of the group TDA 356 X, which is also described in Reference 3, can be used.
The video signal CVBS is also applied to a teletext decoder circuit 9, which comprises a video input processor 9 (1) receiving the video signal CVBS, separates the teletext data therefrom and applies the latter through a data line TTD to a circuit 9 (2) which will be called the computer controlled teletext decoder (abbreviated to CCT-decoder). This CCT-decoder also receives a clock signal from the video input processor 9 (1) through a clock line TTC. The decoder is further coupled to a memory 9 (3) in which one or more teletext pages can be stored and which is therefore called the page memory. This CCT-decoder produces the three previously-mentioned primary signals R', G', B' and also the switching signal BLK. The video input processor 9 (1) may be constituted by the Philips IC SAA 5230, the CCT-decoder 9 (2) by the Philips IC SAA 5240 and the page memory by a 1K8 to 8K8 RAM. For an detailed description of the structure and operation of a teletext decoder circuit reference is made, for the sake of brevity, to Reference 2.
The CCT-decoder 9 (2) is further connected to a bus system 10, to which also a control circuit 11, in the form of a microcomputer, an interface circuit 12, a non-volatile storage means 13 and a volatile storage means 14 are connected. The interface circuit 12 produces the band selection voltage V B , the tuning voltage V T and also the control signals for controlling the analog functions contrast, luminance, colour saturation. It receives an oscillator signal having frequency f' OSC which by means of a frequency divider 15 whose dividing factor is 256, is derived from the oscillator signal having frequency f OSC supplied by the tuning circuit 3. Tuning circuit 3, frequency divider 15 and interface circuit 12 together form a frequency synthesizing circuit. The Philips IC SAB 3035, which is known by the name CITAC (Computer Interface for Tuning and Analog Control) and is described in Reference 4 may be used as the interface circuit.
The storage means is, for example, used to store the tuning data of a plurality of preselected transmitters, or programs. If under the control of the microcomputer 11 such a tuning datum is applied to the interface circuit 12, then it produces a given band selection voltage V B and given tuning voltage V T , in response to which the receiver is tuned to the desired transmitter.
For the microcomputer the microcomputer of the Philips MAB 84XX family can be used. Although it may be assumed that the structure of a microcomputer is generally known, it should here be briefly remarked that it comprises a program memory (usually a ROM) in which the manufacturer stores a plurality of control programs, and also a working memory.
The volatile storage means 14 is used as a page number memory. It comprises a number of N page number-registers having the register numbers R(1), R(2), . . . R(p), . . . R(N), respectively, wherein N=10. This volatile storage means 14 which is shown in the drawing as a separate memory, is preferably constituted by a portion of the working memory of the microcomputer 11.
To operate this television receiver a control system is provided which in the embodiment shown is in the form of a remote control system and is constituted by a hand set 16 and a local receiver 17. This receiver 17 has an output which is connected to an input (usually the "interrupt"-input) of the microcomputer. The receiver may be the Philips IC TDB 2033 described in Reference 4 and then has for its object to receive infrared signals transmitted by the hand set 16.
The handset 16 comprises a control panel 16 (1) which, in addition to a number of numeric keys indicated by the numerals 0 to 9, has the following keys; a saturation key SAT, a brightness key BRI, a volume control key VOL, a teletext key TXT, a mixed-mode key MIX, a program key PR, a storage key ENT and a read key RCL. The keys of this control panel are coupled to a transmitter circuit 16 (2) for which the Philips IC SAA 3004 which is described in detail in Reference 4, may, for example, be used. If a key is depressed, then the transmitter circuit 16 (2) generates a code which is specific for that key and which transmitted on a infrared carrier to the local receiver 17, is demodulated there and thereafter applied to the microcomputer 11. Thus, the microcomputer receives control instructions and through the bus system 10 energizes one of the circuits coupled thereto. It should be noted that a control instruction may be single, that is to say that it is complete after only one single key has been operated. It may alternatively be a multiple instruction, that is to say that it is not complete until two or more keys have been operated. This situation occurs, for example, when the receiver is in the teletext mode. In that case operating the numeric keys does not produce a complete operating instruction until, for example, three numeric keys have been depressed. Such an operating instruction, consisting of for example three figures is called a page number.
Operation of the Television Receiver
The operation of the television receiver shown in FIG. 1 is wholly determined by the various control programs stored in the internal program memory of the microcomputer. A control program which is always stored in such a receiver, is the switch-on program SWON which is symbolically shown in FIG. 2. Although this program is generally known, it should be noted for the sake of completeness that this program immediately applies a predetermined tuning datum present in the strorage means 13 to the circuit 12 after the receiver has been switched on, in response to which the receiver is tuned to the relevant transmitter. This may either be a predetermined transmitter, or it may be the transmitter the receiver was tuned to at the moment it was switched off.
After the switch-on program has been performed, the initiation program INT which is symbolically indicated in FIG. 3 is started. During this program the content of the first page number-register R (1) is made equal to a fixed page number; for example 100 (one hundred). This page number 100 is also applied to the CCT-decoder 9 (2) which decodes this page, stores it in the page memory 9 and displays it on the picture screen 8 after the teletext key TXT or the mixed-mode key MIX has been operated. To determine whether a key has been depressed, the so-called background program BGR, which is shown symbolically in FIG. 4 is started.
After the teletext key or the mixed-mode key has been operated a teletext program is started which is given the reference numeral 50 in FIG. 5. This program includes a step 51 in which the value 2 is assigned to a vector p. Thereafter, in a step 52 it is checked whether a page number is received. If so, then a storage program 53 is passed through or, if negative, a read program 54. After such a program has ended, it is checked in step 53 whether a new page number is received.
The storage program 53 includes a step 531 in which the page number received is stored in the register R(p). Thereafter, in a step 532 it is checked whether the storage key (enter key) ENT has been operated. If not, then this storage program has ended and the content of the register R(p) can be overwritten by a different page number. If the enter key has been operated, the vector p is first incremented by one in a step 533. Acting thus, the registers R(1) to R(N) can be loaded with page numbers of a first series of teletext pages. These pages can now be sequentially displayed on the picture screen by means of the read program and by operating the read key RCL. More specifically, the read program 54 has a step 541 in which it is checked whether the read key has been operated. If no, the read program has ended, if yes the contents of the registers are shifted in a step 542 to registers of the next lower number, that is to say the content of register R(2) is shifted to R(1), the content of register R(3) is shifted to R(2) etc. Thereafter the vector p is decremented by one unit in a step 543. So now vector p indicates the empty register having the lowest number. If now a new page number were received and the storage key ENT were depressed, then this new page number would be stored in the register R(p-1). Before the associated teletext page can be displayed, the read key RCL must then first be depressed p-2 times. Prestoring the page numbers of the desired teletext pages and the fact that only one key (namely the read key) must be operated to effect the display of these pages, makes this television receiver very user-friendly. However, the fact that a new page number cannot result in the immediate display of the associated page when not all the page number registers are empty (so that the vector p=1) is experienced as annoying. To increase the convenience and ease of use of this television receiver the storage program is provided, as is shown in FIG. 6, with an auxiliary read program 534 consisting of one step 5341 in which it is checked if after reception of a page number the read key RCL has been operated without the storage key ENT having been depressed. If this is indeed the case, then in a step 5342 the content of register R(p) is transferred to register R(1) and thus the relevant page is pulled-in and displayed as soon as the opportunity arises.
With the program shown in FIG. 6 a subsequent, new page number can be applied after the preceding new page number has been transferred from register R(p) to register R(1). A storage and read program with which the successive display of the teletext pages of the first series can be interrupted to enable the storage of a second series of pages in a sequence the user wants them to be displayed and the sequential display of the pages of this second series in response to the pushing of the read key RCL, followed by the display of the original (first) series of pages, is illustrated in FIG. 7. This program differs from the program shown in FIG. 5 in that now the read program 54, has, instead of the program step 543 a program step 543' in which the vector p is made equal to two after each operation of the read key RCL and the register contents have been shifted one register in step 542, this vector becomes equal to two.
The storage program 53 further comprises a step 535 in which the contents of the register R(p) to R(N-1) are shifted to registers of a next higher number.
If, after the read key RCL has been depressed and the read program has been performed a new page number is applied to the microcomputer, then in step 535 the content of the second register R(2) is shifted to the third register R(3), the content of the third register R(3) is shifted to the fourth register R(4) etc. Thereafter the new page number is stored in the second register R(2) in step 531. If thereafter the storage key ENT is operated, then the vector becomes equal to 3. A new page number is then stored in the third register R(3), whilst the original content of the third, fourth, fifth, sixth etc. registers are shifted to the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh etc. registers, respectively. So acting thus a second series of Q-1 page numbers can be stored in the registers R(2) to R(Q) each time the read key RCL is operated, the page numbers originally contained in these registers being shifted to registers of Q-1 higher numbers. When the read key is now operated, these Q-1 page numbers of the second series are first applied to the teletext decoding circuit and only thereafter the display of the original (first) series is continued.
The program shown in FIG. 6, which provides the possibility of storing a new page number directly in the first register, and thus to display the associated page on the display screen at the first opportunity can advantageously be combined with the program shown in FIG. 7. For the sake of completeness, FIG. 8 shows a program comprising both the program steps shown in FIG. 6 and those shown in FIG. 7. To have this program proceed adequately, the steps 5343, 5344 are additionally present which, in view of the foregoing need no further explanation.
The teletext programs shown in FIGS. 5, 6, 7 and 8 are structured such that storing a series of new page numbers requires the operation of the storage key ENT after a new page number has been applied. It is however, alternatively possible to structure the teletext program such that the storage key must be operated before a new page number is applied. Such a teletext program is shown for the sake of completeness in FIG. 9. It comprises a step 51' in which the vector p is given the value one. To enable, a decision which the program shown in FIG. 6, also now the immediate storage of any random page number in the register R (1), this program has a step 60 in which it is checked whether a page number is applied. If yes, this page number is immediately stored in the first register R(1) in step 61, whereafter early display of the relevant page can follow. If no page number is coming forward, then it is checked in step 62 whether the storage key ENT has been operated. If not, the read program 54 is effected or else the storage program 63.
The read program again includes the steps 541 and 542. It now also has a step 543" in which the vector p is again made equal to one. The storage program 63 has a step 631 in which the actual value of the vector is incremented by one. Thereafter, in a step 632, the arrival of a new page number is awaited, whereafter in step 633 the contents of the registers R(p) to R(N-1), respectively are shifted to the registers R(p+1) to R(N). Finally, in step 634 the latest page number is stored in the register R(p).
The teletext programs mentioned in the following have the property that those page number registers R(.) in which no page numbers selected by the user are stored remain empty. This implies that when the user repeatedly depresses the read key he may be confronted by the situation that all registers are empty. To prevent this situation from occurring, these registers may be filled automatically with page numbers for which there are two adequate possibilities. Firstly, they might be the page numbers of preferred pages which had previously been stored already by the user in a non-volatile memory, for example, the memory 13 in FIG. 1. Secondly, they might be the page numbers S+1, S+2, . . . etc., S being the last page number of the first series. To accomplish that the page number registers are filled thus with page numbers, the teletext program might be of a structure as shown in FIG. 10. This program corresponds to a considerable extent to the program shown in FIG. 8, but differs therefrom in several respects. Step 52 is followed by a step 70 in which a page number and also a user flag flg.(-) are stored in the registers R(2) to R(N) (see FIG. 1). More specifically, the page number in the register R(i) then becomes one higher than the page number in the preceding register R(i-1), so that at the end of this step 70 the page number registers R(1) to R(n) contain the respective page numbers 100, 101, 102, 103, . . . 100+(N-1). The associated user flags are all zero.
If at a given value of the vector p a new pagenumber, for example S, is applied, then in step 71 it is first checked whether the user flag (flg(p) in the register R(p) is equal to one. If not this implies that the register R(p) is not filled with a page number explicitly stipulated by the user. In step 721 this newly applied page number S is then stored in this register R(p). At the same time the associated user flag flg (p) becomes 1 to indicate that this page number has been selected by the user. Thereafter a step 722 is performed which corresponds to step 70. More specifically, the page number S+1 is then stored in the register R(p+1), the page number S+2 in the register R(p+2) whilst the associated user flags flg(p+11), flg(p+2), etc. all become equal to zero, signifying that these page numbers were not explicitly stated by the user.
If upon performing of step 71 it appears that the user flag flg(p) in the register R(p) is indeed equal to one, then in step 535 the contents of the registers R(p) to R(N-1) are shifted to the respective register R(p+1) to R(N), so that in step 531' the latest page number can be stored in the register R(p), the associated user flag flg(p) then simultaneously becoming equal to one.
This teletext program further differs from the program shown in FIG. 8 in that the auxiliary read program 534 has a further step 5345 and the read program 54 has a further step 544 identical thereto. In these steps, each time after the last page number register R(n) has become empty because of the shift operation effected in the preceding step, a page number which is one higher than the page number stored in the last-but-one register R(N-1) is stored in this register R(N). At the same time the associated user flag flg (N) becomes equal to zero.
It should be noted that in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 the control circuit is predominantly constituted by the microcomputer 11. In practice it has however been found advantageous to arrange between the microcomputer 11 and the CCT-decoder 9(2) a second micro computer which only controls this CCT-decoder 9(2) and for that purpose comprises one of the teletext programs described in the foregoing.


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